dog running away - DogFence Got A Dog Who Runs Away? dog running away - DogFence Got A Dog Who Runs Away?

Dog Running Away

Defra Approved Electric Fence For Dogs

Electric fence for dogs. What You Need To Know!

An electric fence was designed ultimately to stop straying dogs.  This can be expanded on for a multitude of scenarios and dangers, to  members of the public and dogs themselves.

Pets love to be out in the fresh air, with freedom to explore. But just letting them out isn’t always practical or safe. A responsible owner wants to keep their pet close to home and out of harm’s way.   A Dog Fence Pet Containment System you can do just that!

DogFence provides a range of smart, hidden electric fencing for dogs. All of our Containment Systems uphold the rigorous standards of pet protection as laid out by the Electronic Collar Manufacturers Association (EMCA) and are DEFRA Approved. Defra Approved Electric Fence For Dogs

The words “Electric Fence” is not technically the case for our hidden fence products…. The Dog Fence system has no electrical current and is hidden underground operating on FM frequency radio waves.

Your pets can enjoy the full run of your garden and grounds all day, whether you are with them or not, improving their quality of life.

The pet containment system is a radio fence and not an electric fence system.

There is no doubt about that fact that dogs learn through associative learning. When Bruno sees his lead he is likely to get excited, when he hears you touching his bag of food he may drool and run to his bowl. When the bath is run he may go hide! In this same way, your dog may associate the boundary of the hidden fence as a no go area after installation and training.

What You Get With An Electric Fence For Dogs:

  • Safe for your pets (DEFRA Approved).
  • Works of Radio frequencies not electricity.
  • Effective for any number of pets.
  • Full installation and training.
  • Pets are free to run, not run away.
  • Cost effective compared to traditional fencing.
  • Can keep pets out of ‘No-go’ areas.
  • Not just dogs, it’s a pet fence and cat fence.

If you are worried about having been away from home for too long, without having let your pet out. It might be that you are worried about your dog bothering the neighbours, straying and getting lost, or being involved in an accident on the road.   Even if you have a static fence installed, a dog can be a great escape artist!

Modern roads are dangerous enough without the additional hazard of stray pets. The nightmare scenario here is that your pet could cause an accident, in which someone could be fatally injured and your pet can suffer the same fate. Responsible pet ownership now means that we have to keep our pets secure.

Using our DEFRA approved electric fence for dogs provides the solution to all of these concerns.

DogFence supplies a system for keeping pets within the boundary of a property without the need to install and maintain an unsightly, expensive traditional fence.

The concept of electric fencing for dogs, was first introduced in America, more than twenty years ago. Over a million pets now benefit from it and times have changed in that electric shock collars are illegal in the UK.  DogFence has worked closely with DEFRA to provide a product which falls within the remit of legal requirements.  The pet containment system from DogFence is a DEFRA approved pet containment training system.

Pet behaviour is usually easy to condition, our training succeeds in substituting a psychological boundary for a physical one.

What Is A Hidden Fence?

  • A wire is laid around the perimeter of the property or chosen area and is either buried a couple of centimetres underground or attached to existing fencing. A transmitter sends a low power, low frequency radio signal continuously around the wire which acts as an aerial.
  • Your pet (or pets -can be any number on the same system) wears a tiny battery-powered receiver, on the collar which picks up a coded signal from the wire.
  • When the pet comes within the signal range, he hears a warning beep from the receiver which he must learn to obey.
  • If the warning beep is ignored, which may happen just a few times at the beginning. A correction similar to the static electricity sometimes experienced from a car door or lift button will be experienced.
  • The correction doesn’t harm at all, but it startles and your dog doesn’t eagerly want to repeat this experience. Association of boundary is learnt via training and initially the use of marker flags to provide an effective way to contain your pet, even without a physical fence in place.

Installation and training is a provided by DogFence. It is important that our step-by-step procedures are followed if the psychological boundary for your pet is to be established. Our expert training advisers guide you through the training process on installation day and provide future support.

Our friendly and helpful team are more than happy to answer questions and give advice. 100% safe – no electricity is carried along the wire. This is 100% not an electric shock fence.

Get in Touch with your requirements today!

Our team can:

  1. Advise on the purchase of your system.
  2. Assist you with the layout.
  3. Advise on the installation.
  4. Quote for the installation.
  5. Answer any questions you may have.
Invisible Fence - Dog Die In Hot Cars!

Risk a fine up to £20,000 for leaving dogs in hot cars!

Car owners are being urged not to leave their dog in the car on a hot day as it could land you some huge fines and other punishments.

UK motorists are being warned to not leave their dog unattended in a car on a hot day. Authorities urge you to keep animals safe and comfortable on car journeys and not in any danger.Invisible Fence - Dog Die In Hot Cars!

Over the summer months, humid conditions in the UK could send temperatures soaring to as high as 38 degrees Celsius.

Road safety officers warn that it’s both dangerous and illegal to leave an animal in a hot vehicle. Yet still we are seeing posts and videos on Facebook of dogs being rescued from hot cars!

If a dog becomes ill or dies, the owner is likely to face a charge of animal cruelty under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. This offence can bring a prison sentence of up to six months in custody and/or a fine of up to £20,000.

 

Dog Safety – Motorist Guidelines:

  1. Leave your dog at home on warm days.
  2. If you do need to transport your dog, bring plenty of fresh drinking water, and a bowl. Ensure your dog is able to stay cool on a journey.
  3. Don’t let your dog travel unrestrained. Use of a crate or seat belts and travel harnesses is advised. Not buckling up your pet in the car could land you with a £5,000 fine and invalidate your insurance!
  4. If you suspect your dog might be too hot.  You will need to stop somewhere safe for a good drink of water. Animals are unable to sweat in the way that humans can. Dogs cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paws.
  5. If you have left your dog in the car on a hot day.  Be aware it only takes a few minutes to succumb to the symptoms of heatstroke.
  6. If you suspect your dog is developing heatstroke on a journey, stop somewhere safe and take into the shade or to somewhere cool. However, if signs of heat exhaustion become apparent (for example excessive thirst, heavy panting, rapid pulse, fever, vomiting, glazed eyes, dizziness), you should go straight to a vet.
  7. If you see a pet in a vehicle on a hot day, take immediate action. For example, if you’re in a supermarket, roadside service area or garden centre car park, note the car make, model, colour and registration number.  Go inside and ask for an announcement to be made. If this doesn’t bring the owner out, or you’re in a location where finding the owner is impossible, then dial 999 and ask for the police.

Leaving a dog or any pet for that matter is extremely dangerous!

People believe that it is okay to leave a dog in a car on a warm day.  Windows are left open or the car is parked in the shade. The truth is, it’s still a very dangerous situation for a dog.

A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly.  Even when it doesn’t feel that warm to you, there is danger to your dog.  If it iss 22 degrees outside, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within an hour.

It is best to leave your dog at home. If your dog is left outside, make sure there is plenty of shade, water and no means of escape.

Dog Fence offers a great invisible fence solution to ensure your beloved pet remains contained within your property boundaries, when a static fence is not enough of a deterrent!

We urge you to share this post and keep the awareness going!

 

 

pet containment fence - stop adder bites for dogs who escape

UK Adder Bites – Dog Owner Warning – Pet Containment Fence

Vet warns dog owners of the risks of adder bites in warmer weather after a family dog was left fighting for his life.

Five-year-old field spaniel, is believed to have been bitten by an adder while sniffing out sand dunes in North Wales and spent almost two weeks fighting for his life at a Veterinary Hospital in Hartford.  You cannot contain your pet when out walking, especially if they are off the lead.

The venom was so toxic, it caused the skin on the abdomen to blacken, die and peel off while causing severe damage to his liver, leaving vets extremely concerned.

Veterinary surgeon, said, “Obviously, these things are very difficult to predict. It’s more about getting the message out there that it is a risk and to follow the necessary advice. Snakes are more common in some places than others, and tall grassland is a particular risk. It’s definitely something to bear in mind if you have a wandering dog.pet containment fence - stop adder bites for dogs who escape

“The majority of bitten dogs make a full recovery with appropriate treatment. However, this dog was really, really poorly when he came to us and it is only through extensive supportive liver medications, broad spectrum antibiotics and fluid therapy that he came through.

“We’ve not seen a case as severe as this before and we believe the dog had multiple bites.”

The dogs owners, were on holiday in North Wales when their pooch was suspected of being bitten while investigating a recently strimmed area of grassland close to the sand dunes. Although he continued to play and fetch his ball normally, he became lethargic when they returned home and later developed soreness and pain on his left side.

The couple sought veterinary advice on holiday and it was suspected their dog had pulled a muscle but his condition gradually deteriorated and they were forced to return to their home early.

“We were told we were not out of the woods, even with his liver enzyme levels started to come down. It really was touch and go.”

“Quite a number of people who are dog owners have no idea this can happen. Of course we don’t want to scare people but if there’s any chance a dog has been bitten you need to know what to do quickly because the symptoms might not show for one to three hours.

The dog had started to develop bruising around his groin area when he returned home from North Wales. “his bloods and his liver enzymes were through the roof.”

Snake bites in dogs are uncommon in the UK but they can occur, particularly in spring and summer and interestingly between 3pm and 4pm in the afternoon when the adders are most active.

You can identify an adder as a greyish snake, with a dark and very distinct zig-zag pattern down its back, and a red eye. Males tend to be more silvery-grey in colour, while females are more light or reddish-brown.

The message is, if you notice anything unusual, take your dog to a vet immediately. It’s better to err on the side of caution.

There are so many dangers out there for your pet, especially one who has escaped and is roaming unsupervised. As a responsible pet owner, it is important to ensure your pet is contained. Dog Fence provides a pet containment system in the form of a wireless dog fence which works on radio frequency as opposed to electric dog fences and is an effective solution for pet owners with the most cunning of escape artist dogs. Get in touch with our friendly team to discuss your needs today!

 

Please share this post to increase awareness amongst pet owners! Thank you!

Pet Containment System

Pet Containment – If Your Dog Runs Away

Our Top Tips on What To Do If Your Dog Runs Away.

Containment of a dog can be difficult at times, even more so when you are out enjoying the countryside with your pooch.

1. If you see your dog going, try to capture his attention.

Is your dog is too distracted to be off lead?

The position of ears or overall body language is an indicator of when its time to quickly clip a lead on.

However, if your dog is out of reach or has already taken a few steps in the wrong direction, your first step is to try to help him tune back in to you. Clap your hands, call his name as loudly as you can, whistle, use your most excited voice.

As counter intuitive as it sounds, run away from your dog. This may make him think you’re playing a game and he may chase you.

If your dog does come back to you, reward that. Clip a lead on and immediately give scratches and pats. Tell him he’s such a good boy. You want to recognise the correct behaviour—that he came to you. This is not a moment to punish him for running away.

Pet Containment System

2. Leave something of yours where you last saw your dog.

If your dog runs away in the forest leave your coat in the woods.  Come back the next morning or at the end of the day, your dog might be curled up on your coat  The familiar scent attracts the dog and gives a temporary home base.

3. Spread Out

You want to look for the dog, and will walk and walk and call and call until you find him. Get a group together and all do the same thing. Everyone takes a different route and walks out, calling for the missing dog. In this scenario, it’s helpful to have everyone’s phone numbers so that you can call off the search if someone finds the dog.

4. Wait where you are.

Inaction may not be your first instinct, but in my experience, a dog usually hasn’t actually run away. Just gone on his own adventure for a little while but will come back to the trail.

A dogs comfort zone can be up to 10 minutes long.  Initially, stand on the trail and wait for him to come back.

5. Can your dog can be identified.

Ensure your dog  never goes outside without his collar and tags. His tag should have name, home phone number and mobile number.

The times dogs haves been caught by strangers who have immediately called the numbers on the tags, and enabled pick up right away is a tried and tested means when it comes to your pet wearing a tag.

Be aware that sometimes, your dog may become separated from his collar. All dogs should have a microchip, to identify and  associate with all of your contact numbers. The mobile number is important because it may be that you are not always at home.

6. Trust your dog.

Knowing a regular walking route very well may mean your dog could find his own way home.

7. Contact all the shelters and pounds within several miles.

If you do not find your dog within a certain amount of time, obviously you will start contacting the local dog warden/shelters in your area.

It’s a good idea to contact the shelters within a large range such as the next town or county over in all directions or even further. A dog can be turned into a shelter over 50 miles from where they were last seen.

This could be because the dog covered a large distance or because the people who found the dog drove quite a ways to a shelter.

The point is, contact all the shelters in your region and keep contacting them. Often.

8. Have a recent photo of your dog on hand.

Keep a recent photo of your pet on your phone or by email that you can easily pass along to animal control, use on social media or put on posters.

Losing your dog is scary no matter where you are. As dog owners, we want to do everything we can to prevent this dangerous, anxious scenario. However, if the worst happens, I hope that these tips on what to do if your dog runs away will help you reunite with your dog.

The same is true for a dog who has escaped the garden, unlike on a walk, you can manage and stop garden escapes by the use of our invisible fence pet containment system.

 

 

Keep Your Dog Cool This Summer

Many people don’t let their dogs in on the fun because they’re worried about the heat and more.  There is Good news!  Your four-legged friend can enjoy the great outdoors if you follow these key tips for keeping dogs cool and safe.

Keep Your Dog Hydrated

Keeping dogs cool in summer requires having plenty of water on hand. One of the easiest ways to keep your dog cool and hydrated is to carry a portable, collapsible water bowl and bottles of cold water when you go out.  Make sure your dog drinks Invisible Fence - Keep Dogs Cool In Summerwater every hour. If your dog starts panting excessively, get him into the shade and offer more water right away.

Get your dog wet

One way to keep your dog cool during outdoor gatherings is to allow him to swim or do other water play activities.  Always check out a venue ahead of time to determine what water options are available for your dog.  It’s also a good idea to bring a few old towels along to dry your dog after play.

Keep your dog out of the midday heat

Avoid exercising with your dog on those hotter days, and if you must, at least avoid the midday hours or anytime it seems too hot for yourself. When going for a walk, avoid hot asphalt that can burn your pet’s paws, keep running to a minimum, and bring plenty of cold water to hydrate and cool your dog.

Keep your dog out of a parked car

With all the tragic stories in the news, this should go without saying — but you should never ever leave your dog in a parked car, not even for a moment. According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Cars parked in direct sunlight can reach internal temperatures up to 131°F-172°F when it’s 80°F-100°F outside.” Even with the windows cracked, temperatures rise quickly – hot enough to cause irreversible organ damage or even death.

Keep your dog out of the dog house

Dog houses aren’t safe in hot weather, because they block air flow and trap the heat inside. If your pet is outside, be sure to keep him or her in the shade when possible, with plenty of water on hand. You can add ice to their water bowl if it’s especially hot to help keep your dog cool when he’s outside.

Know the signs of heatstroke in dogs and what to do

Heatstroke is a serious hazard for dogs on hot days, especially those who are very young or old, or not in good health. Watch for the following signs of heatstroke in your dog:

  • Excessive panting and salivating
  • Obvious discomfort
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Disorientation
  • Seizures

If you see any of these signs in your dog, move him or her into a cooler environment right away and call your vet. You can use ice packs and give your pet some cool water to alleviate the condition until you get to the vets.

Many of the complications from heatstroke do not begin to appear until several days after the incident — but prompt veterinary care can potentially prevent or treat some of these complications.

So, when you and your four-legged best friend head out this summer, remember these important tips for keeping dogs cool outside.   If your dog tends to escape the garden you cannot ensure they are cool when out adventuring without you, it is ideal to invest in an invisible fence system when a static fence does not suffice.

Dogs Freedom & Safety – Livestock Attacks

We are sure that your pet’s freedom and safety are of paramount importance to you?

Recently, there is a direct link between the ban on electronic shock collars (e-collars) and attacks on livestock.  In the UK, farmers businesses and their animals are suffering.

Farmers want tougher penalties to be enforced, under the Dangerous Dogs Act.  £3.5 million worth of livestock has been subject to attacks, within the past 3 years.  This is a shocking 113% rise.

New research shows, above all, dog owners are putting their pets on leads when there is nearby livestock.  However, insurers show increasing concerns, of reports, that attacks happen for instance by dogs, who get let out in gardens, escape and attack the sheep, in neighbouring fields.

Let’s take a look at some facts:

 

Freedom Fence Stop Dogs Attacking Livestock

  • 45% of owners admit to leaving their pet at home each day.
  • 28% of dogs left for over 4 hours.
  • 13% of dog owners say their pet has separation anxiety.
  • Research suggests this is much higher at a whopping 85%.
  • Bored or anxious dogs will escape if they can.
  • £1 million in sheep and livestock, savaged by dogs over the past 4 years in Wales.
  • In England this tots up to £3.5 million in the past 3 years.
  • Pet owners fined up to £1000 in court.
  • There is great uproar and calls by farmers for the Dangerous Dogs Act to further increase these penalties.
  • Correlation made between these attacks and the ban of illegal electric shock collars.

Working Towards A Resolution?

  • Dog Fence Ltd has worked closely with authorities for public consultation and our system is approved as Legal, you can read more here that Dog Fences Are Not Banned, for further clarification.
  • Farmers relieved that dog fences (aka. containment fences) are exempt from the proposed e-collar ban.
  • Dog fences have been around for over 40 years.
  • Modern systems achieve criticism, without understanding the mechanics and function of an invisible pet containment fence system.
  • Dog’s & Cats account for 16% of reported animal deaths on major roads in the UK over the past 24 months.
  • It is more important than ever to keep your pets safe at home.
  • The Government has announced that they will implement new regulations into the installation of dog fences.
  • Regulations state how dog fences and cat fences will be correctly installed and owners receive the correct training.
  • DEFRA consulted with DogFence Ltd, as our Company pioneered the full installation and training service to the UK.
  • Since 2003 DogFence Ltd have been offering full installation with training for their pets to the dog fence or cat fence systems.

Get in contact with our team to discuss your needs to prevent yourself from a huge fine, other livestock from potentially getting injured or killed and to keep your pet safely contained with a safe and UK legal dog fence system.

shock caused by electric dog fence

Electric dog fence – the myths and the truth!

What is an electric dog fence?

Electric dog fences have recently made the news. Just like Marmite, they are a contentious issue; people are either strongly for or violently against these systems.

Actually, there is no such thing as an electric dog fence.  The correct name for a dog fence is a radio dog fence. A dog fence does not have any electricity in the cable and is physically incapable of electrocuting a dog or a cat.  Of course, we all know that electric fence is a system used to keep livestock within an area. This type of fencing does have electricity running through the wire or net and is able to deliver an electric shock.

How does a dog fence work?

With a dog fence, the boundary wire carries a harmless radio signal. The dog or cat wears a computer collar which is programmed to pick up the radio signal. The size of the radio field can be altered to the size or breed of the pet. When the pet enters the radio signal zone the collar wakes up and gives out a high pitched warning beep. Should the pet continues further into the zone the collar gives out a static impulse; not an electrical shock. The impulse is similar to a Tens machine or abdominal exercise machine and is completely safe and harmless. The impulse is called a “correction” as it is designed to startle the pet and train them to avoid the area. The label “electric dog fence” is usually given as people assume that an electric shock is delivered when nothing could be further from the truth!

How does an electric fence work?

An Electric Fence is an electrical circuit that is charged by an electric fence energizer.  A high voltage current is sent through the wire, tape or netting.  The charge is sent through the fence in 1-2 second intervals. The fence acts as an open circuit.  This becomes complete when an animal or person standing on the ground touches it.  If an animal touches the wire the circuit closes and the current passes through the animal to deliver an electric shock.

Dog fences are cruel!

Interestingly, recent research has proved that dog fences are far from cruel, in fact, it has been proved that they save lives. Research carried out via the UK Government in conjunction with containment fence Companies and also a privately funded study through Lincoln University has proved that containment fences save lives.

Professor Daniel Mills an eminent Feline Expert “While some will argue that electronic containment systems can never be justified for pets, others highlight that, in the UK alone, hundreds of thousands of cats are killed and injured on roads each year and these devices can prevent these often fatal injuries and the emotional cost to the cats and their owners. In contrast, housing cats solely indoors to remove such risks is associated with increased prevalence of a range of health problems including obesity, Feline Urologic Syndrome and dental disease. Long-term exposure to common flame retardants widely used in homes may also have toxic side effects for cats.”

Sheep Attacks

Rising dog attacks on sheep also highlight the welfare issue that stray dogs can cause to other livestock. Stray dogs can kill sheep, cats and cause RTA’s. Farmers in many areas support the use of “electric dog fences” to keep their own stock safe. In Scotland, the increasing dog attacks on sheep has led to a public consultation regarding changing the law through a Protection of Livestock bill. Whilst the #takethelead campaign is a good starting point. Many dog attacks on livestock are from dogs that have escaped from the property. Similarly, leads can break and collars can be incorrectly fitted so training your dog not to chase sheep is a must.dog fence stops livestock attacks

Far from being cruel dog fences save lives. Much better a small static impulse and some training than the bullet of a gun or being PTS by on a court order.

Can you use an electric fence for pets?

There is no law banning the use of electric fencing for dogs or cats. Whilst the voltage on these systems is very high no testing has been carried out to determine the long effects.  There are certain safety features found within “electric dog fences” that are not found in electric stock fences.

Dog Fence verses Electric Fence

  • Dog Fence – audible warning as pet approaches
  • Electric fence – no warning until pet touches the wire
  • Dog Fence – Automatically shuts down after 15 seconds to prevent distress
  • Electric fence – will continue to shock until the pet is released.
  • Dog Fence – can be used under driveways and open areas
  • Electric fence – can only be used where no access is required
  • Dog Fence – a static correction is humane
  • Electric Fence – high levels of shock may not be good for pets.

Sadly the media and social media groups have given dog fences a bad name. Both research and those that use these fences prove that these systems save pets lives. The label electric dog fence naturally conjures up the idea of a dog being electrocuted or wired up to the electricity. Nothing could be further from the truth. We all accept that sometimes we have to deliver a small amount of discomfort to save a life. We vaccinate our pets and we microchip pet, both of which cause moderate discomfort.  Yet we hear the cries of cruel and barbaric when we discuss dog fences.

Is this because people do not understand how they work or how they feel? These blogs are designed to be open and honest about how the systems work and if you would like to learn more please call us on 03450 623623 or visit our web site https://dogfence.co.uk/. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

invisible dog fence to stop dog going through gate

Invisible dog fence – can pets out run them?

Can dogs run out of an invisible dog fence?

When looking into purchasing an invisible dog fence one of the most commons concerns is will it work? Can the dog run out of the containment fence? Of course, just a like an ordinary fence if the fence is broken or poorly installed it won’t work. So as with any product, an invisible dog fence needs to be correctly installed but more importantly, both the dog and owner need to know how to use it.

If the fence is correctly fitted and both the pet and owner are trained then a “dog out” will rarely happen. In fact, at DogFence we are so confident we even offer a containment promise on our fully installed dog fences.

So what are the reasons that a dog may outrun a dog fence system?

1. Dead Battery

Unlike other brands of containment fences, our Invisible Dog Fences have a long battery life. However, it is still important to check the battery using the tester every 6 months on our mini collars or 18 months on our larger collars. Consistency is the key to the successful use of an invisible dog fence. If the battery runs out the dog can run out. As a rule, we find that 60% of our troubleshooting is down to a dead battery. Using an invisible dog fence is similar to using your car, it requires fuel to operate and needs topping up and checking once in a while.

2. Loose Collar

As with all brands of containment fence, collar fit is crucial. If the collar is dangling around the dog’s neck like a necklace then it will be completely ineffective! Whilst it is true that once trained 90% of dogs will never receive a collar stimulation again the impulse may need to be activated if the dog is in a high drive moment. If the dog enters the zone and carries onto in the avoidance area with no consequence he or she will quickly learn to challenge the fence. A loose collar = a dog on the lose. We always advise checking the collar fit regularly – your pet may lose or gain weight so checking the collar monthly is extremely important. Our handy troubleshooting guide shows how to test the battery and check the collar fit.

3. Invisible Dog Fence Training – lack of Training

As with anything in life you only get out what you put in! When it comes to containment fencing Training is the keyword. If your pet is not correctly trained to use the fence then it will not work for you or your pet.

DogFence is the only UK Company to offer full onsite training within the package. In 2018 the UK Government announced that they would introduce new legislation to ensure that all dog fences are sold with an installation package. At present, the legislation is still pending. It is hoped that through this legislation there will be a standardized certification program. As a small part of our customer base chose to self-install a DIY Dog Fence we offer full support. Naturally, unlike a total mail order Company, our years in the field mean that we can offer expert guidance and support to those who chose to self-install.

When is come to containment training there are 4 critical elements:

  1. Warning flag & audible only familiarisation
  2. Introduction to correction (impulse)
  3. Distraction Training
  4. Reinforcing Training

Warning Beep Training

All invisible dog fences should be sold with flags – at DogFence we use a min of 20 per 100m. The collar should be set to audible only and the pet should be introduced to the training flags. It is with warming beep that will stop the pet in a red mist or high drive moment.

Introduction to correction

The pet must be on a lead through phases 1 – 3 at all times. This is part of the training where the correct impulse level is determined for each pet. It is important to start on the lowest possible level and look for any signs of recognition/reaction to the impulse. This could be as subtle as a flick of the ear of a small flinch. All good containment fence collars should have flexible training levels.

Distraction Training

Once the pet is avoiding the training flags it will be necessary to create some distractions. These can be getting a game going with the pet, having someone else walk through the flags or bringing another dog to the property. Our DogFence Installers will usually involve the customer as part of the distraction and it’s a great way for the owner to really get involved.

Reinforcing Training

Once the pet fully understands the containment fence it is important that he or she associates it with the property and not the installer. The installer will leave full written instructions on how to carry on and when to allow the dog off the lead (cat training is carried out internally).

Freedom!

Once trained the pet has complete freedom and the owner has peace of mind.

 

4. Faulty equipment – Not all Containment Fences are the same!

Dogs will be dogs and the invisible dog fence collar goes through a lot of wear and tear. Many brands of containment fences are Chinese made and the quality is poor. Our invisible dog fences are high-quality but even these can go wrong. Recognizing that consistency is king DogFence offer a Lifetime Warranty on our professionally installed fences. The warranty covers both the transmitter and the computer collars. And because dogs will be dogs we add in a warranty to cover dog chews on the computer collar as well!

As with a car, it is important to check things are working. Our Installers will show you how to carry out the simple monthly checks using the testing tool. Using the correct battery is extremely important. A good quality containment fence collar should alert when a battery is required. At DogFence we recognize that people are busy so we also offer an automatic battery renewal programme.

Similary boundary wire quality is vitally important. If the boundary wire is too thin it will be very prone to damage. DogFence uses a high-quality heavy-duty boundary wire which is 25 times heavier than most DIY brands supply.  When looking for an invisible dog fence look for the following:

  • Long Battery life containment fence giving cockapoo freedom in the garden
  • Lifetime Warranty on Transmitter & Collars
  • Heavy-duty wire
  • Professional Installation & Training
  • Full after sales service

Escaping dogs will always be a problem as they can cause road accidents, kill or harm livestock or wildlife. Using a containment fence is an excellent way of giving the pet freedom but keeping them safe at home. Not all containment fences are the same and not all containment fence suppliers offer the same level of service. If you would like to receive some professional advice and information call us on 03450 623623.

 

 

Pet Containment System

How Can I Keep My Dog In The Garden?

Pet Containment System

Dogs love spending time outdoors, but you may not be able to realistically walk your dog for hours every day. If you live in a home with a fenced-in garden, you can let your dog spend some outside time every day on your property.

In order to keep your dog confined to the garden boundary, you’ll need to ensure that your pet containment system is in place and your dog won’t escape and that you prioritise your dog’s needs being met.

It’s important that you spend time with your dog, so never leave your dog outside for prolonged periods of time without proper supervision and attention.

By giving your dog a safe, fun environment to play in, your dog can have plenty of exercise and outdoor time right outside your door.

Keeping Your Dog Safe Outside

Check the weather.

Extreme heat or extreme cold can potentially kill dogs left outdoors. Some dog breeds, like pugs, are particularly sensitive to extremes in temperature. You should never leave a dog unattended outdoors for prolonged periods of time, especially if the weather is going to be very hot or very cold.

Humidity and wind chill can also endanger a pet. All dogs are sensitive to humidity because they pant to cool themselves, and if the air is very humid their bodies will overheat very quickly.

Check the weather and the humidity/wind chill levels before leaving your dog outside. Add the air temperature (in Fahrenheit) plus the humidity level, and if that number is higher than 150 your dog is at risk of heat stroke.

If the temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 degrees Celsius), you should keep your dog indoors.

Wind chill can quickly kill dogs left outdoors, regardless of what the air temperature is. Bring your dog indoors if the air temperature or the wind chill drops below freezing in your area.

Short-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in cold weather, while long-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in hot weather.

As a general rule, if you’re too warm or cold while exposed to the elements outdoors, your dog will be too.

Pet Containment System

 

 

 

Give your dog water.

Dogs need constant access to fresh, clean drinking water. In hot weather, dogs will need to drink even more water. You can help keep your dog cooler in hot weather by adding ice to the water bowl.

Provide some shade and shelter.

Dogs need relief from the elements, and if you don’t let your dog indoors that relief will have to be provided outside. Your dog will also need a place to retreat to if it starts to rain or snow, or if your pet simply wants to feel safe and protected.

Dog houses don’t protect dogs on hot days. If anything, the confining space actually makes your dog even hotter. Shade from overhead trees is ideal.

If you don’t have trees in your garden, you can hang tarps across part to give your dog a breezy, shaded spot. Your dog should also have a covered area to retreat to if it rains.

A small dog house or some other type of shelter would be ideal for this situation. Make sure your dog’s shelter blocks out the wind if you plan on leaving your dog outdoors during the winter. Your dog should have a raised bed so it is not lying on the ground, whether it’s hot out or cold.

You may want to consider an insulated doghouse as well to protect against heat and cold.

Exercise your dog.

Dogs need exercise every day in order to stay physically and mentally fit. If your dog is not getting enough exercise, leaving it outdoors in the garden will lead to bored, restless behaviour.

That behaviour is often destructive and undesirable. You may assume that being outside is its own form of exercise, but to your dog, it may feel like abandonment.

Never leave your dog in the garden without first giving it some type of exercise. Make sure your dog gets at least two long walks each day that leave your pet tired and panting. This will help ensure that your dog isn’t bored or restless.

Leave toys outside.

In addition to exercise, dogs need time to play. It’s good for their minds and bodies, as the physical exhaustion of play is usually mixed with solving puzzles, hunting, or chasing.

Try leaving chew toys in the yard, as well as toys that can be filled with food. Kong toys, for example, will keep your dog occupied and make your pet feel like it’s working to earn its food.

Limit outdoor time.

Leaving a dog unattended is, generally, considered safe if it’s for brief periods of time.  However, every dog is different and some dogs may have intense anxiety about being left alone. Anxiety can lead to undesirable behavioural issues like digging, chewing, fighting the fence, and incessant barking whilst outside.

Remember that dogs are pack animals. They need companionship, and if you leave them alone outside all the time they may experience psychological trauma.

If your dog is alone for prolonged periods of time, it will get bored and create destructive “jobs” to relieve that boredom.  To ensure your dog is safe and is not engaging in any behavioural problems, keep unsupervised outdoor time to a minimum.

Confining Your Dog to the Garden

Build a tall fence.

The safest way to keep a dog on your property is by having a fenced-in yard. A fenced-in garden, carries a risk, that your dog has the potential to jump over the fence or dig underneath it to escape.

Make sure your fence is tall enough that your dog won’t be able to jump over it. Ask your vet or a qualified dog trainer how high your dog (based on breed, body size, etc.) can realistically jump.

Check your fence for weaknesses. A strong dog could easily break through a weak fence or squeeze through a small gap.
If you don’t want to fence in your whole yard, consider building a dog run. You can buy and connect chain link fence sections, then put a roof over the run so your dog will have shade and won’t be able to jump out.

Avoid tying or chaining your dog.

Though a tethered line may seem ideal for outdoor time, especially for dogs that dig or jump, it’s actually quite dangerous.  A dog can easily sustain an injury by getting tangled up in a rope, leash or chain.  This is why it’s so important to supervise your dog at all times.

Accidental strangulation is a significant risk for dogs who are left tied up, alone, for prolonged periods of time.  Dogs left tied up or chained outside frequently has built-up energy and aggression. These dogs may take out that aggression on people, including family members.

Some countries actually have laws against tethering dogs. Keeping your dog tied or chained, may result in fines and end with your dog being taken from your home.

Consider A Wireless Dog Fence.

People falsely assume that a dog can be safely left outdoors when there is an electronic fence in place. However, electronic fences are actually quite unsafe for dogs and here in the UK many are illegal.

Dogs often run through the fence barrier to chase animals or flee from fireworks and are reluctant to cross back into the garden, leaving them wandering the streets aimlessly.

Make sure you get a wireless pet fence which is legal for use in your country such as the DogWatch system by DogFence who have worked with the government to ensure their product fully conforms to legislation.

If you would like a free in-home consultation for the installation of a wireless pet containment system, please contact Dog Fence today!

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

Is A Dog Fence For Me? Pet Containment Solutions.

In need of a dog fence for a currently escaping dog?

Are you asking yourself how hard it can be to contain your best friend? Many breeds of large dogs want to get in touch with their wild side and chase the neighbourhood squirrels or bark at cars. If you have a big, strong, energetic dog, you should think carefully about the type of fencing for dogs needed before adding it to your garden.

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

The trick is to find a fence that satisfies your budget and aesthetic desires while stopping your furry friend from going on the adventure of his doggy dreams.

Here are four factors to keep in mind when choosing the perfect fence:

 

1. Big dogs need big fences …because they can jump!

A four-foot high fence is unlikely to deter a Husky, Golden Retriever, or Labrador, so you should look for a fence with a height of five or even six feet. For most breeds, six feet should be sufficient. Dog owners start adding extensions to make their fences higher and higher, enables your dog to learn how to jump a little higher each time! Your best bet, in this case, is to tear down your old fence and install a wireless pet fence.

2. Make that fence impossible to climb!

No matter how high your fence is, a clever dog will still try to get over it somehow. Even if he can’t jump it, he may be able to climb it. When choosing a fence, it’s crucial to make sure the design of the fence itself is totally climb-proof. Chain link fences are a bad idea for climbers—they provide your dog with easy footholds! A solid panel fence, on the other hand, has a flat surface without anywhere for your dog to stick his paws, yet your ingenious pooch can leverage items close by to get a foot us such as planters placed alongside a fence. Even better is a wireless dog fence that eliminates any climbing.

3. Give a little privacy!

Okay, your dog may not care about privacy at all, but a wooden privacy fence is a great option for peace of mind. Aside from their climb-proof nature, solid panel privacy fences are great because your dog can’t see what’s on the other side. If he can’t actually see other dogs and people and everything else he loves to bark at, he’ll be a lot calmer. He won’t be visible to other dogs on their walks either, who may get distracted and start barking. Ultimately, choosing the best fence for your dog depends on how your dog behaves and reacts to the outside world. So take some time to consider what will best suit your four-legged companion before making a decision.

4. Make your pet not WANT to escape!

Dogs don’t usually like being restricted, whether it’s a physical or invisible barrier. Boredom is a major factor that tempts dogs to try to escape your garden. If your dog requires a lot of exercise but isn’t being walked regularly, putting up an adequate fence will not be an easy fix to your problem. Maybe you’ll be able to prevent your dog from escaping, but your dog won’t be very happy—and an unhappy dog makes an unhappy owner. Dogs simply don’t thrive when they are cooped up in a little yard. A fence is necessary to keep your dog in, but as a behavioural fix, it’s only a starting point. Creating a dog-friendly garden is one way to keep your dog entertained between the fence walls.

Conclusion

Not everyone has a spacious garden or the ability to provide a dog with ample exercise. That’s exactly why bigger dogs aren’t for everyone, but the right fence does go a long way in terms of keeping your dog safe and secure. Managing massive dogs can be a massive challenge, but for owners that are able to take that challenge, it’s worth the effort so you can keep your dog around for massive cuddles.

Need a wireless fence for your pet? Get in touch & request your quote today!