Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

How To Keep Your Dog’s Freedom Safe This Spring

Freedom as Spring is just about to arrive, with this comes the pleasure of getting out and letting your pet roam and explore inside the garden fence boundaries once more.Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

Spring Pet Freedom Safety Tips.

  1. Use heartworm and flea and tick preventive Now!  Your dog or cat should be receiving year-round monthly heart-worm preventive.
  2. Be lungworm aware. Lungworm can be contracted either by dogs eating slugs and snails, or from drinking water from a bowl where a slug or snail has been.  Even picking up a toy that a slug or snail has crawled into poses a risk.  So don’t leave toys in the garden overnight and regularly clean out any water bowls in the garden.
  3. Spring clean carefully – As you clean out your garages and prep your gardens, treat your fence etc.  Remember these activities may pose a risk to your pet. Fertilisers, pesticides, weed-killers, and even mulch can all be dangerous to dogs and cats.  Take care when you are putting things like this inside your garden boundaries,  where they are accessible for your pet to investigate or worse consume.
  4. When gardening, DO NOT use slug pellets to protect your plants, as these are tasty but toxic to dogs and can have fatal results.
  5. Just because the suns out doesn’t mean you should instantly take your pet out on long walks.  Your dog will be just as out of shape from winter inactivity as you are.  This is the time of year veterinarians see torn ligaments, strains and sprains, and a variety of aches and pains in dogs. Take it easy. Gradually build up strength and stamina, this is especially true in older pets.
  6. Longer days also mean pets go into “heat.”  For many stray, homeless, and neglected dogs and cats, this means unwanted litters. Animal shelters and rescue groups are typically stretched to capacity during spring.  Do what you can.  If you know someone looking for a pet, encourage adoption or rescue.
  7. It is a legal requirement for all dogs in the UK to be micro-chipped, so make sure your dog is chipped and your contact details on the microchip database are kept up to date.  Also your dog should wear a collar and tag, bearing the owner’s details whenever he is out in public.  If your dog makes a bid for freedom, beyond your garden fence, it can mean paying a sum to your local dog warden to get your pet back.
  8. The sun can be quite intense even in the Spring so do not leave dogs in cars on hot days.
  9. Plants are popping up in the spring and there are some flowers and plants which pose a danger to your pets.  Lilies are especially toxic to cats, if ingested every part of the lily came cause serious health problems and even be fatal.  For dogs – lilies, azaleas and foxglove flowers and even daffodil bulbs can present a danger to your dog.
  10. Always keep your dog on the lead in fields where there is livestock. Chances are they will have young this time of year, especially lambs. Also be aware that birds like pheasants and swans nest on the ground so don’t let your dog disturb the nests.
  11. Keep an eye on your dog in the garden as dog thefts from gardens are on the increase.  NEVER tie your dog up outside a shop – every day we see stories of dogs being stolen in this way.

What else happens in spring?Freedom beyond the fence in spring for dog walking

That’s right Easter – a time for chocolate and sweets.  Children and adults can accidentally drop these around the house, in the garden and out in public. A dogs trusty nose can sniff out a sweet treat with ease.

But here it is, its not a treat, it’s a danger – Why?

Chocolate – Chocolate, even in the smallest amounts, can cause serious health problems if ingested by a dog. The darker the chocolate, the greater the danger to the dog. Beyond the initial symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea, chocolate toxicity can lead to tremors, increased heart rate, heart failure, seizures, and in some cases, can be fatal.

Xylitol – Sugar-free candies and gum can contain large amounts of the artificial sweetener Xylitol.  Xylitol is highly toxic to some dogs and has been found to cause low blood sugar and liver failure.

Freedom For Your Dog?  Have You Checked Your Fence?

Your dog may spend longer in the garden now, so check your fencing and gates are secure both to prevent your dog escaping and to prevent your dog being stolen.

Perhaps you would prefer a specialist invisible pet fence so you have peace of mind that your beloved pet won’t escape.  They get out through open gates, dig their way out under a fence or even climb or jump over it, thereby having the freedom to roam.  Worse still your dog could end up in a road accident.

With a little foresight and planning, spring can be the best time of year for your pet. Go out in the fresh air and enjoy the freedom of spring!

 

robotic mower and dog fence with dog wearing dog collar

Dog Fences and Robotic Lawn Mowers working together

Dog fence and robotic lawn mower can they work together?

So you have a dog fence and want to buy a Robotic Lawn Mower? You’ve been online and worked out that the two products may well interfere with each other. You don’t want your dog fence to fail and equally, you don’t want grass up around your ears! You need to find a robotic mower that will work with your dog fence or vice versa?

Why do robotic mowers and dog fences interfere with each other?

Both dog fences and robotic lawn mowers use a buried wire that acts as an antenna and conducts a radio signal. An electromagnetic signal field is created around the cable. All but one dog fence systems use an AM radio frequency. This is the issue with installing both robotic mowers and dog fences next to each other. As with a magnet when you bring the same poles together they repel the signal. If no signal is being emitted one or other of the units will not work.

Are there any robotic mowers and dog fences that will work in harmony?

Yes, there is one brand of dog fence that will work with most robotic lawn mowers. The DogWatch brand which is sold by DogFence in the UK is the only system that will work in close proximity with a robotic lawnmower without interference. We have noted from experience that the cheaper brands of robotic mower tend to be more prone to interference than the Premium brands. Similarly, cheaper dog fences are highly susceptible to false activation from all sorts of household objects.

The DogWatch system uses a Digital FM signal on either 4 or 8 kHz. These frequencies are very low and the FM signal is much less prone to false activation. AM frequencies are very susceptible to noise. Notably, noise affects amplitude which is where information is stored with an AM signal (AM = Amplitude Modulation). With an FM signal (Frequency Modulation) the signal is transmitted through frequency modulation and not amplitude. Noise-based interference is a common issue for AM dog fences.

What happens when there is interference with the robotic mower and the dog fence?

With our DogFence the robotic mower will not cause any loss of signal or false activation to your dog’s fence collar. If in the event there was any interference it would be the mower that would be affected. In these cases, the robotic mower tries to read the dog fence signal and becomes confused (poor thing!).

Moving the boundary wire may help the situation. Depending on which brand of mower you choose you may have to keep a little gap between the dog fence and the robotic mower boundary wires.  Our Dog Fences can be re-programmed by the owner to either frequency and as a general rule, this eliminates any interference issues.

To date, we have had very good success with the following products when used in close proximity.

robotic lawn mower husqvarna

Husqvarna works well with DogFence

Husqvarna

Robomow

If you would are interested in purchasing either a robotic lawn mower or dog fence and have any technical questions please call us on 01628 476475.

 

sheep grazing keep dogs on lead to stop dog sheep chasing sign

Escaping dogs in the country are a danger to sheep

Solutions to stop a dog chasing sheep

It’s getting to that time of year when the wildlife is waking up. In early Spring our most common call is I am concerned about my dog getting out and chasing sheep or livestock. Usually owners have tried everything, plugged the hedge, lifted the fence height and all to no avail. If a dog has a high interest in Sheep and has had no training sooner or later he or she will be in with the sheep. For some dogs it’s just the chase, for others it’s the kill. Also a dog with a high prey drive will probably have a high interest in cats or other livestock.

What are the penalties for a dog chasing sheep?

  • Ultimately his life – the farmer has the right to shoot if he considers that the dog is a threat to his flock and there are no reasonable means of preventing it.dog chasing sheep

So What steps can an owner take to prevent their dog chasing sheep?

  • Training – find a good trainer that has a proven track record in this field of expertise (see list below). As Company we recommend a Balanced Trainer. A Balanced Trainer will use multiple tools to train the dog, including an e-collar if necessary.
  • Ensure that the garden fencing is dog proof. If you are rural, even if you don’t have livestock nearby make sure your fence is secure. The wildlife may tempt him out but ultimately he may end up in trouble with a farmer or a vehicle.
  • Walking the dog on a lead where sheep are present. It’s good practice, no matter how good your dog is if there are sheep around pop him on a lead for a few minutes.

Training for sheep chasing

  • Balanced dog trainers will use a range of tools and methods to modify the dog’s behaviour and desire sheep. They will work with you and your dog in a controlled situation and will modify the dog’s desire and interest to chase sheep.
  • Many old school farmers will advocate putting the dog in a pen with an older Ewe. This can be a risky move as a large Ewe can cause considerable damage to a dog when cornered. It is most certainly a harsh method but may ultimately save the dogs life.
  • Some Trainers recommend reward only training. Many dogs will recall well in normal situations using this training method. The issue is if you have a dog with a high drive usually the treat is insufficient to divert the attention and so this method not always successful for sheep chasing.

How can I make my rural property dog proof?

  • Deer or stock fencing may be a solution but can be costly and unsightly. It is also not always effective as dogs will climb up and over or dig under the fence.
  • Electronic dog fences are a great solution as they will back up your current fencing.

Are Electronic Fences banned?

No, electronic fences are not banned and have not been included in the recent e-collar ban proposals. Electronic fences are a great way to give your dog freedom but also keep them safe in the garden. Unlike traditional fences if the dog is trained correctly then the fence will keep even the keenest dog at home. Interestingly, a dog fence can also often be installed on terrain that is not suitable for traditional fencing. A dog fence, often referred to as an electric dog fence, will also cover driveways and vulnerable open areas.

The word “electric” is actually incorrect as there is no electricity in the cable or the collar. As with an e-collar, it is a static impulse that is generated, very similar to a Tens machine. When a dog is trained to an “electric dog fence” he is conditioned to respond a warning beep. The training is gentle and effective, with many owners asking “when will he get the shock?” only to be told that the dog has already received the stimulation.

DogFence Ltd have been installing the hidden dog fences for over 16 years. We have fenced and contained many dogs on their last chance saloon. We offer a containment promise with our Professional Dog Fences but as with all dog ownership this does involve management from the owner.

  1. Put the collar on the dog every day – it’s useless in the draw!
  2. Make sure the collar is correctly fitted – a lose collar can equal a lose dog!
  3. Remember to change the battery at the correct interval – DogFence batteries last 6 months or 2 years depending on the collar and we even offer automatic renewal programmes so you don’t forget.

Conclusion

The majority of dog owners recognise that dogs need to be trained so that they can enjoy walking together. Sadly owners cannot be present 24/7 and it maybe that the dog escapes from the garden and ends up in a field full of sheep. Installing an electronic dog fence gives owners peace of mind whilst allowing the dog the freedom to enjoy the open air.

If you would like to know more about how DogFence can secure your garden give us a buzz. Our lovely office team can measure out your boundary and give options for the fence remotely. Call us today on 01628 476475 or click here for a quote.

Below is a list of Balanced Dog Trainers that we recommend for sheep chasing:

Take The Lead Training – Devon  – Jamie Penrith.

Dutiful Dogs – London & South East England – Nicky Bulter

Southend Dog Training – Essex – Adam Spivey

Paws in Nature – Cheshire – Andrew Lang

 

 

fencing for dogs

Fencing for dogs we explore the options for dog owners

Best fencing for dogs – what are the options?

When is comes to fencing for dogs it really depends on several important points. A big dog will need a big fence. A four foot fence is nothing to a big dog. Equally small dogs are excellent climbers. It is important to consider the dog breed when choosing a fence. Below are some points to consider when finding the best solution for your dog and environment. All dogs are different, your dog may be fine in your present home and then you move and something changes.  Ask yourself the following before choosing your dog fencing solution.

  1. Do you live in an urban area?
  2. Are you rural?
  3. What fencing do you currently have?
  4. What breed of dog do you have?
  5. Is the dog currently escaping?
  6. What size area requires fencing?

Below we have noted some of the most popular forms of fencing for dogs so that Fido stays safe at home where he should be!

Types of fencing for dogs

Chain Link Fences

Arguably this is not the prettiest type of fencing but it is one of the most economical. Chain link fencing can be built to varying heights and can also be used to construct a dog run or pen. The issue chain link dog fencing being climbed by dogthat people often have with chain link fencing is that other larger wild animals (foxes and badgers) can cause damage to this type of fence.  When the fence is damaged this gives the dog  an open avenue to the outside worldwide.

Interestingly Terriers are particularly good climbers and often see chain link fences as an easy ladder to escape. the lovely links make great foot holds for both large and small dogs. Chain link fences tend to be a popular choice for more rural customers as they can be softened with foliage. If you have a large breed of dog the fence height should be a minimum of 6ft to prevent a “climb out”.

Close Board Wooden Fences

This is probably the most popular type of fencing for urban areas. A Close Board fence can be a good option because the dog cannot see the rabbits and squirrels living on the other-side! This may curtail his desire to wander but in some cases can increase anxiety. If a dog can hear but not see what is the other side of the fence this may increase his territorial behavior and lead to excessive barking.

When it comes to fencing it’s a mid priced option if you have a small town garden. This type of fencing for dogs is usually sufficient but if your dog is a digger or a climber then this may not be the best solution. A 6ft close board fence is usually only installed in the rear of the garden so you may have to look at other options for the front of the property. Take note if your dog is a digger you should also concrete below ground!

Stock  and Deer Fencing

Stocking and Deer fencing is usually only installed on large rural properties. When installing this type of fencing it is usually best to get the fence dug into the ground to prevent the dog and wildlife digging under it. This can be a costly exercise for large areas and depending on the breed may need to be quite high to prevent a “climb out”. Stock fences can be installed in front of hedges to give a secondary barrier. If you have a very small dog then a stock fence will be ineffective as the dog can squeeze through the wire.

Electronic dog fence

Incredibly, this type of fencing for dogs has been around for over 40 years. It is a little known fencing solution for dog owners in the UK but widely used in the USA. The advantage of an electronic dog fence is that it can be used on both large or small properties. The electronic dog fence is invisible and so does not create any unsightly barriers. There are several advantages that electronic fencing has over traditional methods.

  1. The dog cannot dig under or jumper over the electronic dog fence.
  2. It is cheaper than traditional fences.
  3. Does not obstruct views and is not unsightly.
  4. Can be taken with you if you move.
  5. Protects the drive even if the gate is open.

Even on most standard urban gardens and electronic dog fence is a most cost effective solution. It is simple to install and offers a safe and effective solution. Having been rigorously tested by Lincoln University these fences are have been proved safe and effective.

If you are intrigued but think how our fence may not work for you why not read some of our customer testimonials. If you would like to know more our experienced professionals can chat to you. We can then put together a bespoke estimate for your dog, property and budget.

For an  for an estimate call or contact DogFence on 03450 623623 or info@dogfence.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

dog fence boundary flags with dog in training

Electronic dog fence – How to train your dog.

Simple Steps for training your dog to an electronic dog fence

Before commencing electronic dog fence training:

  1. Ensure that you have the correct amount of training flags to cover the boundary. The training flags are the most important part of the training protocol for electronic dog fences. The training flags should be placed approx 8 – 10ft apart around the boundary. Use the collar to find the edge of the avoidance zone and place the flag in the ground in the area where the collar starts to beep.white electronic dog fence flags are placed around the boundary to give the dog a visual
  2. Using the dog fence tester – set the collar to beep only mode. This means that the collar will not give out an impulse just an audible tone.
  3. Place the electronic dog fence collar on the dog and check that it correctly adjusted. As a guide you should be able to get 2 fingers in the neck strap when the dog’s neck is down. See our Trouble Shooting page for handy tips.
  4. Leave the collar on the dog for at least 30 mins before commencing the initial training session.
  5. Find a long lead – 6ft and ideally not the dog’s usual walking lead.

Commencing the training

  1. Take the dog outside on the lead.
  2. Walk the dog around the boundary and tap the flag so that there is good movement.
  3. As you tap each flag use a command word – a good example is “Watch out”.
  4. Allow the dog to go past the training flags into the correction zone (this is the area of the electronic dog fence where the collar will give both a beep and impulse). Allow the dog to linger here and hear the warning beep then direct him back into the garden. Use the command word and tap the flag again.
  5. Repeat this around the boundary for several small sessions over 1 – 2 days.

Introduction to Correction

  1. Place the electronic dog fence collar on the dog approx 20 – 30 mins before starting the training.
  2. Using the tester – lift the level on the receiver from level 0 (beep only) to level 1.
  3. Repeat the process of walking around the boundary and tapping the flags. Always use the command word when tapping the flag.
  4. Allow the dog to go past the flags into the avoidance zone. Look for any signs that the dog is feeling the impulse (a small twitch of the ear, little shake of the head).
  5. Carry on around the boundary allowing the dog to walk into the avoidance zone of his own free will. Never call or drag the dog into the electronic dog fence zone.
  6. If the dog is not responding to the level – lift the level to level 2 and repeat the process. Always direct the dog back into the safe area and praise the dog when he is back in the safe zone.
  7. Once the dog is reacting to the stimulation make a note of the level.
  8. After training play with your dog, praise him and reward him. Do not allow the dog to be off the lead in the garden during the training phase.

Introduction to Distractions

It is important the dog fully understands the warning beep and how to retreat when he is in a high drive moment. By carrying out the distraction training your dog will learn the electronic dog fence so that it becomes second nature. This will ensure that even when he is in a high drive state he stops at the warning beep. The distraction training will require 2 people.

  1. Walk around the boundary, tapping the flags and then have the new person walk into the flags and well into the avoidance area. See if the dog continues or decides to stop.
  2. If the dog continues allow him well into the zone to receive the stimulation and guide him back to you in the safe area. Give him the command word whilst guiding him back to the safe area. Praise him in the safe area.
  3. If the dog stops before or at the flags guide him back and praise him.
  4. Continue walking around the boundary and repeating the process.
  5. Once the dog is making the right decision (not walking into the flagged area) move on and try this on the driveways or open areas.
  6. If the dog is making good progress you may wish to drop the lead and walk into the flagged area with the companion. If the dog endeavors to follow give the command in aloud and firm voice.
  7. A good indication that the dog is fully at home with the electronic dog fence is when he looks away from the flags.

Repeat this process over a couple of days.

Letting your dog off the lead

  1. Walk the dog around a couple of areas and tap the flag if possible. Usually by this stage the dog will not venture near the flags so just give the command word even if you are several feet away from the flag.
  2. Go to the centre of the property and face the dog away from boundary.
  3. Remove the lead and start to walk back towards the house or a safe area.
  4. Play with your dog outside – you can roll a ball but always roll away from the avoidance zone.
  5. Do not leave the dog unsupervised in the garden for the first few days.
  6. After 14 days you can start to remove the flags. Remove the flags every other flag, every other day until they are gone.

Keep the flags in a safe place as if you wish to add on another pet you will need to re-flag the boundary and if you change the layout this will need to be re-flagged to give the dog a visual.

Points To Remember

Training your dog to the electronic dog fence should be fun!

Never throw a stick or ball into the avoidance zone.

Small bit size sessions are often better.

Always remove the dog fence collar at night or for a period of 8 hours in every 24 hour period.

Check the fit for your electronic dog fence collar regularly.

Check the battery status on your collar monthly (using the tester supplied).

DogFence Ltd are the largest installers of electronic dog fences in the UK. Our professional installer/trainers can set up your dog fence for you and will train your pet to the system. We also offer a post installation service to train new pets to the system. If you would like more information please call us on 01628 476475 or email info@dogfence.co.uk.

 

 

 

 

a dog is for life - retriever puppy in santa hat

A dog is for life!

A dog is for life – t’was the month before Xmas

T’was a month before Christmas and all around the house the children were squealing we want a pet mouse;
Or a hamster, a kitten, a dog or a horse. We PROMISE to look after it forever, of course!

So straight onto Google the parents they went; looking for puppies from Carmarthen to Kent.
A Springer, a Boxer, a Cocker or Lab. A puppy t’was decided would be incredibly Fab.

On the week before Christmas, the puppy came home.
To shouts of excitement and can I give him a bone? a dog is for life - retriever puppy sleeping

All soft and adorable with huge puppy eyes.
But all through the night for his mother he cries.

The children were sad; does he not love us dear Mum
We thought he’d be bouncy and all full of fun!

He poohed on the floor and chewed up their toys.
He barked and whimpered and made a strange noise.

He peed on carpet and jumped on the beds
and by morning the family had their hands in their heads!

Who knew having a puppy could cause so much stress,
We just weren’t prepared for all of this mess!

But puppies like children seem rather demanding
and puppies need training and words of commanding.

Oh what shall we do? shall we keep him or not?
Just send him away and be forever forgot?

Shall we contact a trainer, who knows what they’re doing,
Perhaps they can help with the peeing and poohing.

Should we have taken better advice,
looked at the kitten or the little white mice?

But all pets have needs whatever they be;
Whether they’re fluffy or furry or really scaly!

The family decided to stick with this boy
and after seeking some help, they were rewarded with joy!

A happy, loyal friend who’s been loved and adored,
A playmate forever so the kids were not bored.

Now he is old, smelly and grey
And the family have loved him for many a daya dog is for life - old retriever

He’s been there through trauma, sadness and sorrow
and given his love for today and tomorrow.

And when he is gone the family will hurt
As the memories of Archie cannot be usurped.

So remember this Christmas a dog is for life,
he’ll poo on your floor but he will change your life.

Sam Chapman – DogFence Ltd

 

dog fence ideas - dog with question mark

Dog Fencing Ideas, How To Decide

When you are researching for dog fencing ideas you will see there are many different types of dog fencing from standard fencing to electronic or even invisible fencing options.

Why Do You Need A Fence?

Most pet owners, at some point, have an issue with a dog that likes to take themselves for a walk; loves to jump the back fence (even if its 6ft tall) or is a serial digger, who can move soil like you’ve never seen before. A dog will quite happy at escape in search of things to chase, other people meet or jump up, pets to socialise with or simply because they feel its time for a walk.

Not all people like dogs, they could be frightened of a dog who is roaming without it’s owner.  As a pet owner it is your responsibility to ensure not only the safety of your dog but the risk an escaped dog poses to others. This is not to say that your pet is vicious and will attack. Most likely too friendly and may knock someone over or has no road sense and causes an accident.

The Positives of Fencing:

  • Your pet is safe from harm.
  • Other people are safe from your pet.
  • No paying the dog warden to get your pet back which are over £50 a time can mount up, especially if you have a frequent escape artist.
  • Unexpected vet bills, will not be due to injury or poisoning or worse being shot by a farmer.
  • No unexpected puppies, if your dog has not been spade or neutered.
  • You don’t end up having to pay for others vet bills for another injured animal.
  • Peace of mind that your pet cannot escape.

Dog Fencing Idea’s

Wooden Panel Dog Fencing Ideas

What height do you need 3ft, 4ft, 6ft – wooden panel fencing may well look like it provides a secure area but other than the fence posts, the panels sit above ground. The enables a dog to dig their way out under a wooden fence. Or perhaps your pet is energetic, can jump high – is a 6ft fence going to hold them back? Maybe you have a 3ft fence and are considering a higher one? What will this do for a dog that can jump? The answer is simple, it will only teach them to jump higher and higher. It’s better to start high so you do not have to foot the bill to replace fencing panels trying to retain your pet.

You may also need to place obstacles to deter jumping or plant bushes, or you can pay out even more money for an angled roof section which slopes inwards at the top of your fence. To maintain a wooden fence costs money and effort; wood treatment to stop rotting or repairs from weather damage.

This option can be quite costly to you and you cannot leave your dog unattended in a fenced garden.

Wire Mesh Dog Fencing Ideas

One word – Barking – caused by barrier frustration that your dog can see others and is either guarding or demanding their attention as they pass by. Of course a dog left out all day can boredom bark and a wire mesh fence allows for others who cannot stand the barking to opportunity to be able to tease, release, injure or even poison your pet, yes this does happen!

Dogs do bark when they hear things, but more so when they can also see but feel enclosed they try to alert their owner to someone else’s visual presence. It can also cause fence running due to frustration. To combat this you would not be able to leave your dog unattended in a fenced garden.

Chaining Your Dog Up

This is a recipe for aggression and lack of exercise for your pet. Unable to seek shelter from weather unless you invest in the cost of building a shelter for them. I guess the question you need to ask if you are even thinking of this is would you like to be chained up for long periods of time? This is not really a freedom fence or a fair form of containment.

Wireless Dog Fencing Ideas

And so we have the solution……the inescapable fence – or is it?

Well the answer depends on what type of wireless fence system you go for:

The AM Frequency Wireless Dog Fence:

  • Many household appliances including televisions, WiFi, computer monitors, light dimmers, motors etc emit a noise based signal that AM receivers “hear” and incorrectly acknowledge as their own signal, triggering an unwanted response.
  • AM receivers can be confused and accidentally trigger as the receiver assumes the signal is correct.
  • AM systems use two signals, to try to alleviate the problem, but this slows the reaction time down.  On both the start up and shut off time on the receiver.  This is why dogs and cats can “out run” the signal on AM systems.  The pet also continues to be corrected with shocks from their collar, when outside the fencing zone.
  • The AM signal is usually pulsed using an on/off transmission, however when in the off state is where interference with other AM signals can occur causing the receiver to miss the total signal.
  • False activation can happen because AM receivers do not ignore all noise based signals.
  • Pets are able to run through an AM signal and then most AM systems continue to shock your pet over and over once outside the boundary.

The FM Frequency Legal Wireless Dog Fence:

    • A safer an quicker than AM and ignores AM signals
    • A secure digital signal, which ensures no interference is received.
    • FM receivers only hear their own transmission so no false activation occurs especially where patented Safelink technology is used.
    • The FM transmission is a fast signal and more energy efficient.
    • FM signals can work in electrical noise environments.
    • Transmitters can be used near or against electrical appliances.
    • The output power remains constant.
    • Wireless dog fences transmitters can be attached to metal or stock fencing, without signal loss.
    • The FM signal eliminates the risk of false correction and necessary shocks to your pet.
    • The FM frequency hidden dog fence provides an uncross able barrier for your pet.
    • The shock collar has a safety cut-off, this ensures there is no continuous shocks delivery, in the unlikely event of a boundary breach.
    • Costs a fraction of the price of alternative fencing ideas.

To conclude the best dog fencing idea if you want to ensure your pet cannot escape into harms way is to opt for an FM frequency wireless fence. Dog Fence have provided this system to tens of thousands of pet owners throughout the UK. If you are serious about keeping your pet safe and happy with the freedom of an invisible fence take the time to have a conversation with the team at Dog Fence by getting in touch today.

Golden Retriever running along boundary marked with containment fences

Containment Fences Explained

What are electronic Containment Fences and how do they work?

Containment fences hit the news earlier this year when the Government declared that they intended to ban e-collars for training dogs.

Sadly, the media jumped in with both feet first and declared that containment fences were also to be banned. At DogFence we were horrified having Professionally installed containment fences for over 17 years we had no idea why! For our customers that already used a containment fence there was outrage. How could the Government even consider banning a fence that had saved their pets life and given them back their freedom?  For those that had not heard about containment fences there was intrigue. What is a containment fence and why do they want to ban them?basset hound enjoying freedom with containment fences

Even the MP that called for the ban didn’t know if the containment fence was to be included within any ban and the officials at DEFRA did not know how containment fences worked! As experts in the field for containment fencing DogFence were invited to meet with officials from DEFRA and demonstrate the fence.

The comments from the DEFRA team were as we suspected “it’s not that bad” and “it’s not what I imagined”.

So what is a containment fence?

It’s actually an invisible fence or virtual fence which is created by a radio signal. Originally invented to keep dogs safe at home in the USA where gardens are traditionally unfenced their popularity has grown in recent years.

A containment fence is actually a very simple and unobtrusive system which can be installed on virtually any property at a fraction of the cost of traditional fencing. It also offers for safety than conventional fencing as the pet can’t dig under or jump over the fence and it protects open areas such as driveways.

A boundary wire is placed around the property boundary which transmits a coded radio signal to a collar worn by the pet. When the pet approaches the boundary wire a high pitched warning beep alerts the pet to go back. If the pet continues forward, an electrical impulse is given through the collar (this is often referred to as a correction or static shock) and the pet retreats back into the safe area.

How does the pet know where to go?

Every pet undergoes a training programme which usually takes 2 – 5 days. When training to a containment fence it is important that the boundary is flagged to give a good visual of where the virtual fence starts. The flags stay in the ground as a visual marker for approx. 2 – 3 weeks. Containment fences can be used for dogs over the age of 12 weeks and cats 16 weeks or over.

The trainer will take the dog outside and set the collar to “beep only” mode. Using some voice commands, he will introduce the dog to the containment fence training flags and later he will allow the dog to enter the “no go area” of his own accord. By re-focusing the dog back into the safe area with the assistance of the warning beep and vocal commands the pet will quickly learn where he can or can’t go. Following the beep only session the training moves onto to assess the correct level of impulse (correction) required for the pet.  If the owner has more than one pet the likelihood is that they will each have a different training level.

containment fences are marked with training flags

Visible boundary for the pet with flags.

 

With cats the training is carried out internally following the Dog Fence Cat protocol. This training protocol was used as part of the Lincoln Cat Containment Fence study.

 

Will the containment fence hurt my pet?

Of course the thought of giving any impulse or shock to your pet can be abhorrent. It is important to note though that the impulse is very low and is usually only felt during the training phase. The sad scenario is that the pain felt from a car is almost unimaginable and the discomfort of containment fence is no worse than an annual vaccination. Also for dog owners there is always the threat of a shot gun as dog attacks on sheep are rising annually.

What areas of the garden will the containment fence cover?

Interestingly, containment fences can cover the entire garden including the driveway. The largest installation that we have installed at Dog Fence is 450 acres. Usually the fence wire is dug directly into the ground (approx. 3 – 5” below the surface) but it can be attached to existing physical boundaries. It is not uncommon for the fence wire to be attached to post and rail fences, stone walls, run through hedges, ditches or streams and even the odd moat! When it comes to the driveway any surface can be crossed except Resin bonded drives which require special attention.

Containment Fence Collars

The original containment fences from the early 80’s used heavy bulky collars but as with the mobile phone technology everything has been scaled down in recent years. Not only have the collars become smaller and lighter but the battery life has also increased.

At Dog Fence we can boast the smallest and lightest collars worldwide. Our mini containment fence collar only weighs 30g but still features an incredible 6-month battery life. Incredibly our standard collar has a 2-year battery life and weighs in at only 48g which is still the 3rd lightest collar available worldwide!

How much do containment fences cost?

A containment fence costs a fraction of the cost of installing a traditional fence or driveway gates. Unlike a wooden or stock fence a containment fence becomes more cost effective the larger the area. Naturally the price is dependent on the owner’s location and the number of dog or cats that they have. There is no need to visit a property to give an estimate for the containment fence; this can all be carried out via our online survey tool.

Summary

Thankfully, the Government looked at the evidence, research and responses from containment fence owners and deemed these lifesaving systems safe to use. Indeed, Michael Gove stood up and supported the life-saving fences in Parliament.

If you are interested in receiving a quick free quote contact us today on 01628 476475 or fill in our quote form https://dogfence.co.uk/quote/

our mini receiver R7m is suitable for Pomeranian dogs

Electronic dog fences – are they safe for small dogs?

Are electronic dog fences safe to use for small dogs?

Electronic dog fences have been around for over 40 years. Unsurprisingly in the early years this type of electronic dog fencing was most certainly not suitable for small dogs. Why were they not suitable? Size and weight of the computer collars!  Many of the early collars used a 9 volt battery to power the collar which was both bulky and heavy. As with mobile phones recent advances in technology have enabled the size and weight of the computer collars to be dramatically decreased.

At DogFence we are proud to be able to offer the smallest and lightest electronic dog fence collars on the market today. Our mini computer collars weigh only 30g including the small 3.0 volt battery. Our electronic dog fence collars are suitable for all breeds of dogs and cats and with the increasing popularity of toy breeds our sales of mini collars has risen significantly in the last 5 years.

Bengal cat wearing R7m mini electronic dog fence collar

Small enough for cats too!

Will the electronic dog fence hurt my dog?

Naturally a common concern is that the “correction” or impulse will hurt the dog. Naturally, at DogFence we are all dog lovers and the last thing we would want to do is inflict pain or suffering onto any dog or cat. The impulse level is set to each dog or cats personality. People often asks does it hurt? can I feel it?  In reality, once they feel the impulse the next reaction is usually “how will that keep my dog in?” or “oh it’s not that bad!”.

Electronic dog fences have been tested by leading Universities and pet professionals across the world. The results have proved that these fences are safe to use with both dogs and cats. The amount of impulse delivered is not determined by the size of the pet but their personality. The average setting for most dogs is level 2 this would equate to some 250 times lower that a cattle of electric stock fence.

Interesting, the impulse is generally only received during the training phase. All our electronic dog fence collars give out a warning beep prior to giving out the impulse. During the training phase the pet also has a visual marker with training flags. If the training is carried out correctly the pet will rarely receive any activation after the initial period. All our DogFence installers are qualified to train your dog or cat to the containment system. DogFence is a member of the IACP an international organisation set up for training dogs using electronic stimulation alongside conventional training protocols.

Will I have to use the electronic dog fence forever?

This is always a difficult question to answer. It really depends on your dog’s personality and hunting drive. As a rule we find that dogs and cats that are trained before the escaping behavior begins will train quickly and easily and never challenge the fence. However, if you have livestock or game birds nearby and a dog with a high drive then it is advisable to use the system everyday. With electronic dog fencing consistency is king. If every time the dog enters the zone they hear the warning beep they will not “challenge” the fence. Issues can arise  if they can go through the zone one day because they are not wearing the electronic dog fence collar and not on another day it becomes confusing to the pet.

What do the Experts Say?

Professor Daniel Mills headed the study into the use of electronic dog fences

Prof. Daniel Mills
RCVS

Recent studies through Lincoln University, headed by the well revered Prof. Daniel Mills, and the Governments research have proved that electronic dog fences are  only safe and also save the lives of dogs and cats. With modern technology size is no longer a barrier to pet containment with an electronic dog fence. Read more about what the experts say on our web site.

If you would like to learn more about how an electronic dog fence can keep your pet safe contact us on 01628 476475 or email us @ info@dogfence.co.uk.

 

 

three poodle cross breeds wearing electric dog fences collars

Electric dog fences – Weighing up the pros and cons

Electric Dog Fences: Pros and Cons

Electric dog fences are both a safe and affordable solution to keep your dog safe at home whilst allowing them freedom to roam and play within your properties boundary. In recent years due to their flexibility and effectiveness electric dog fencing has become increasing popular for cats as well.

It goes without saying that electric dog fencing is not for everyone. It’s important to fully understand how the fences work and weigh up the pro’s and cons between electric dog fencing and traditional fencing.

How do electric dog fences work?

There are two types of electric dog fences, wired and wireless. The most popular and effective are the wired systems.

Wired Fences

The fence consists of a transmitter box, a boundary wire and a small computer collar which is worn by the dog or cat.

The transmitter box is installed on site and the boundary wire is connected to the transmitter box. The is buried around the perimeter of the property and wire carries the harmless low-level radio signal around the boundary.  The pet wears a computer collar that emits a warning beep followed by a mild stimulation (similar to a carpet shock) when he gets too close to the designated area. The no go area for the electric dog fence is marked with some temporary training flags to assist the pet with a visual. The dog fence Installer trains the pet to understand the avoidance area.

Wireless Fences

With the wireless dog fence there is no boundary wire. The transmitter is located centrally around the area to be fenced. The transmitter sends out a circle of signal from the base station. Unfortunately, wireless dog fences are prone to false activation and are only effective for flat properties with no obstructions for the signal.

When it comes to the electric dog fence there are two types — wireless and in-ground. Even though they work in different ways, both systems consist of some sort of base unit that creates a hidden boundary around whatever area you want to contain your dog in. Read more about wireless dog fences here.

PROS OF ELECTRIC DOG FENCES

  • Price – an electric dog fence is far cheaper than a traditional fence and gate.
  • Dogs and cats can be allowed to roam freely – not kenneled or caged and exhibit natural behaviour.
  • Dog or cat cannot jump over or under and signal is 360 degrees.
  • The driveway is protected so no worries about an open gate or slow electric gates.
  • Can be installed on terrains that are not suitable for traditional fencing. Can be used through streams, along tow paths, woodland, steep slopes and areas with planning restrictions.
  • Quicker to install than a traditional fence. Up to 10 acres installed in 1 day.
  • Electric dog fencing does not restrict views.
  • Can be used to keep pets out of areas – pools, play areas, flower beds.
  • Easier to maintain than a traditional fence.
  • Can be moved from house to house.
  • Electric dog Fence collar also works indoors to keep pets out of rooms or off furniture.

CONS:

  • Does not keep other dogs, cats or wildlife out of your garden.
  • Not recommended for aggressive dogs as with wireless or electric dog fencing there is no physical barrier.
  • Batteries in the dog’s collar must be changed every 3, 6 or 24 months (reputable Companies should offer an automatic renewal programme).
  • If the power goes down the electric dog fence can go down – look for a system with a battery backup.
  • Not suitable for dogs in whelp or very old dogs.
  • Customer must assist with training so can take dogs up to 10 days to fully learn the fence.
  • Must make contractors aware of buried boundary wire if digging or landscaping to avoid damage.

Electric dog fences have been available in one form or another for over 40 years. Recent advances in technology have now brought these fences to another level and items listed in the “cons” list are now easily avoided with the higher specification systems.

The latest electric dog fences

In 2018 DogFence launched their new enabled fence. This new generation of  electrical dog fencing gives the owner real-time information and notifications regarding the status of their system. The fence offer a new 2 way communication between the electric dog fence collar and the base station through an app.

Take a peak at our video which explains all the amazing features in the Smart Fence here.

  • Sends out an email alert for a wire break

    a new generation of electric dog fencing - smart fence uses 2 communication via wifi. Consists of a collar, portable and transmitter.

    The new Smart Fence

  • Sends out an email alert of a challenge to the fence by the pet
  • Send out an email alert regarding the battery level.
  • Activity tracker for each pet through the app.

These email alerts are also sent out to the DogFence office so we can contact the customer to book a service visit or arrange a replacement battery.

If you would like to know more about our Smart Fence or our other fences please contact us on 01628 476475 or email info@dogfence.co.uk.