Pet Containment System

How Can I Keep My Dog In The Garden?

Pet Containment System

Dogs love spending time outdoors, but you may not be able to realistically walk your dog for hours every day. If you live in a home with a fenced-in garden, you can let your dog spend some outside time every day on your property.

In order to keep your dog confined to the garden boundary, you’ll need to ensure that your pet containment system is in place and your dog won’t escape and that you prioritise your dog’s needs being met.

It’s important that you spend time with your dog, so never leave your dog outside for prolonged periods of time without proper supervision and attention.

By giving your dog a safe, fun environment to play in, your dog can have plenty of exercise and outdoor time right outside your door.

Keeping Your Dog Safe Outside

Check the weather.

Extreme heat or extreme cold can potentially kill dogs left outdoors. Some dog breeds, like pugs, are particularly sensitive to extremes in temperature. You should never leave a dog unattended outdoors for prolonged periods of time, especially if the weather is going to be very hot or very cold.

Humidity and wind chill can also endanger a pet. All dogs are sensitive to humidity because they pant to cool themselves, and if the air is very humid their bodies will overheat very quickly.

Check the weather and the humidity/wind chill levels before leaving your dog outside. Add the air temperature (in Fahrenheit) plus the humidity level, and if that number is higher than 150 your dog is at risk of heat stroke.

If the temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 degrees Celsius), you should keep your dog indoors.

Wind chill can quickly kill dogs left outdoors, regardless of what the air temperature is. Bring your dog indoors if the air temperature or the wind chill drops below freezing in your area.

Short-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in cold weather, while long-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in hot weather.

As a general rule, if you’re too warm or cold while exposed to the elements outdoors, your dog will be too.

Pet Containment System

 

 

 

Give your dog water.

Dogs need constant access to fresh, clean drinking water. In hot weather, dogs will need to drink even more water. You can help keep your dog cooler in hot weather by adding ice to the water bowl.

Provide some shade and shelter.

Dogs need relief from the elements, and if you don’t let your dog indoors that relief will have to be provided outside. Your dog will also need a place to retreat to if it starts to rain or snow, or if your pet simply wants to feel safe and protected.

Dog houses don’t protect dogs on hot days. If anything, the confining space actually makes your dog even hotter. Shade from overhead trees is ideal.

If you don’t have trees in your garden, you can hang tarps across part to give your dog a breezy, shaded spot. Your dog should also have a covered area to retreat to if it rains.

A small dog house or some other type of shelter would be ideal for this situation. Make sure your dog’s shelter blocks out the wind if you plan on leaving your dog outdoors during the winter. Your dog should have a raised bed so it is not lying on the ground, whether it’s hot out or cold.

You may want to consider an insulated doghouse as well to protect against heat and cold.

Exercise your dog.

Dogs need exercise every day in order to stay physically and mentally fit. If your dog is not getting enough exercise, leaving it outdoors in the garden will lead to bored, restless behaviour.

That behaviour is often destructive and undesirable. You may assume that being outside is its own form of exercise, but to your dog, it may feel like abandonment.

Never leave your dog in the garden without first giving it some type of exercise. Make sure your dog gets at least two long walks each day that leave your pet tired and panting. This will help ensure that your dog isn’t bored or restless.

Leave toys outside.

In addition to exercise, dogs need time to play. It’s good for their minds and bodies, as the physical exhaustion of play is usually mixed with solving puzzles, hunting, or chasing.

Try leaving chew toys in the yard, as well as toys that can be filled with food. Kong toys, for example, will keep your dog occupied and make your pet feel like it’s working to earn its food.

Limit outdoor time.

Leaving a dog unattended is, generally, considered safe if it’s for brief periods of time.  However, every dog is different and some dogs may have intense anxiety about being left alone. Anxiety can lead to undesirable behavioural issues like digging, chewing, fighting the fence, and incessant barking whilst outside.

Remember that dogs are pack animals. They need companionship, and if you leave them alone outside all the time they may experience psychological trauma.

If your dog is alone for prolonged periods of time, it will get bored and create destructive “jobs” to relieve that boredom.  To ensure your dog is safe and is not engaging in any behavioural problems, keep unsupervised outdoor time to a minimum.

Confining Your Dog to the Garden

Build a tall fence.

The safest way to keep a dog on your property is by having a fenced-in yard. A fenced-in garden, carries a risk, that your dog has the potential to jump over the fence or dig underneath it to escape.

Make sure your fence is tall enough that your dog won’t be able to jump over it. Ask your vet or a qualified dog trainer how high your dog (based on breed, body size, etc.) can realistically jump.

Check your fence for weaknesses. A strong dog could easily break through a weak fence or squeeze through a small gap.
If you don’t want to fence in your whole yard, consider building a dog run. You can buy and connect chain link fence sections, then put a roof over the run so your dog will have shade and won’t be able to jump out.

Avoid tying or chaining your dog.

Though a tethered line may seem ideal for outdoor time, especially for dogs that dig or jump, it’s actually quite dangerous.  A dog can easily sustain an injury by getting tangled up in a rope, leash or chain.  This is why it’s so important to supervise your dog at all times.

Accidental strangulation is a significant risk for dogs who are left tied up, alone, for prolonged periods of time.  Dogs left tied up or chained outside frequently has built-up energy and aggression. These dogs may take out that aggression on people, including family members.

Some countries actually have laws against tethering dogs. Keeping your dog tied or chained, may result in fines and end with your dog being taken from your home.

Consider A Wireless Dog Fence.

People falsely assume that a dog can be safely left outdoors when there is an electronic fence in place. However, electronic fences are actually quite unsafe for dogs and here in the UK many are illegal.

Dogs often run through the fence barrier to chase animals or flee from fireworks and are reluctant to cross back into the garden, leaving them wandering the streets aimlessly.

Make sure you get a wireless pet fence which is legal for use in your country such as the DogWatch system by DogFence who have worked with the government to ensure their product fully conforms to legislation.

If you would like a free in-home consultation for the installation of a wireless pet containment system, please contact Dog Fence today!

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

Is A Dog Fence For Me? Pet Containment Solutions.

In need of a dog fence for a currently escaping dog?

Are you asking yourself how hard it can be to contain your best friend? Many breeds of large dogs want to get in touch with their wild side and chase the neighbourhood squirrels or bark at cars. If you have a big, strong, energetic dog, you should think carefully about the type of fencing for dogs needed before adding it to your garden.

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

The trick is to find a fence that satisfies your budget and aesthetic desires while stopping your furry friend from going on the adventure of his doggy dreams.

Here are four factors to keep in mind when choosing the perfect fence:

 

1. Big dogs need big fences …because they can jump!

A four-foot high fence is unlikely to deter a Husky, Golden Retriever, or Labrador, so you should look for a fence with a height of five or even six feet. For most breeds, six feet should be sufficient. Dog owners start adding extensions to make their fences higher and higher, enables your dog to learn how to jump a little higher each time! Your best bet, in this case, is to tear down your old fence and install a wireless pet fence.

2. Make that fence impossible to climb!

No matter how high your fence is, a clever dog will still try to get over it somehow. Even if he can’t jump it, he may be able to climb it. When choosing a fence, it’s crucial to make sure the design of the fence itself is totally climb-proof. Chain link fences are a bad idea for climbers—they provide your dog with easy footholds! A solid panel fence, on the other hand, has a flat surface without anywhere for your dog to stick his paws, yet your ingenious pooch can leverage items close by to get a foot us such as planters placed alongside a fence. Even better is a wireless dog fence that eliminates any climbing.

3. Give a little privacy!

Okay, your dog may not care about privacy at all, but a wooden privacy fence is a great option for peace of mind. Aside from their climb-proof nature, solid panel privacy fences are great because your dog can’t see what’s on the other side. If he can’t actually see other dogs and people and everything else he loves to bark at, he’ll be a lot calmer. He won’t be visible to other dogs on their walks either, who may get distracted and start barking. Ultimately, choosing the best fence for your dog depends on how your dog behaves and reacts to the outside world. So take some time to consider what will best suit your four-legged companion before making a decision.

4. Make your pet not WANT to escape!

Dogs don’t usually like being restricted, whether it’s a physical or invisible barrier. Boredom is a major factor that tempts dogs to try to escape your garden. If your dog requires a lot of exercise but isn’t being walked regularly, putting up an adequate fence will not be an easy fix to your problem. Maybe you’ll be able to prevent your dog from escaping, but your dog won’t be very happy—and an unhappy dog makes an unhappy owner. Dogs simply don’t thrive when they are cooped up in a little yard. A fence is necessary to keep your dog in, but as a behavioural fix, it’s only a starting point. Creating a dog-friendly garden is one way to keep your dog entertained between the fence walls.

Conclusion

Not everyone has a spacious garden or the ability to provide a dog with ample exercise. That’s exactly why bigger dogs aren’t for everyone, but the right fence does go a long way in terms of keeping your dog safe and secure. Managing massive dogs can be a massive challenge, but for owners that are able to take that challenge, it’s worth the effort so you can keep your dog around for massive cuddles.

Need a wireless fence for your pet? Get in touch & request your quote today!

Fencing For Dogs

Fencing For Dogs – A Beginners Guide

Considering fencing for dogs…. now spring is in the air!  There is nothing quite like getting out and about in the fresh countryside air,  and taking a walk.  This time of year is when many people decide, they would like a pet to accompany them, on there great adventures.

As a new pet owner, one of the first considerations should have is to ensure the fencing, you have is suitable, to effectively contain your dog.

The Benefits Provided by Having FencingFencing For Dogs

There are a number of reasons fenced gardens are beneficial for dogs and their owners.

Some of the most important include:

  • A fenced yard will give a dog room to run, jump, and play, and encourage him to get plenty of exercise.
  • Fenced gardens help prevent boredom. Dogs who get the chance to chase squirrels, smell interesting things, and bark at passing pedestrians will enjoy a ton of mental stimulation.
  • A fenced garden makes it easy to just let your dog go outside and answer nature’s call.
  • Fences are great for those who cannot go to the park. Many dogs have a fun filled time at the local park, but some are not capable of playing nicely with others. Other dogs can’t go to the park for medical reasons.
  • Fencing may help your dog ward off intruders. Even relatively small dogs will often bark up a storm when strangers approach, so a fenced garden may help keep your home a bit safer.

Fences do not replace walks, you will still need to take your dog out daily.  Dogs need to explore and enjoy wonderful smells and pee in all the right spots and need that stimulation.

Dog Proof Fencing

Fences are obviously not a one-size-fits-all item.  You’ll have to go with a style that suits your home, your tastes, and your dog. In actuality, dog fences are, almost, always “custom built” to satisfy these and other criteria.

This means you’ll need to think carefully, about a number of issues, when selecting the best dog escape proofing for your home.

Some of the most important things to consider include:

  1. Installation
  2. Aesthetics
  3. Property Lines
  4. Durability
  5. Maintenance
  6. Security
  7. Cost

If your dog is a jumper, digger or great escape artist, you should seriously consider an up to date type of fencing for dogs.  The invisible dog fence is a growing more popular as a way to contain your dog whilst giving them freedom to roam and safety.  Ideal for unusually shaped gardens and perimeters and for those pet owners who do not wish to have a physical fence around their garden.

Get in touch with us today to discuss your dog fencing requirements and our friendly team will be happy to advise you on how an invisible fencing system can benefit you and your pet.

Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

How To Keep Your Dog’s Freedom Safe This Spring

Freedom as Spring is just about to arrive, with this comes the pleasure of getting out and letting your pet roam and explore inside the garden fence boundaries once more.Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

Spring Pet Freedom Safety Tips.

  1. Use heartworm and flea and tick preventive Now!  Your dog or cat should be receiving year-round monthly heart-worm preventive.
  2. Be lungworm aware. Lungworm can be contracted either by dogs eating slugs and snails, or from drinking water from a bowl where a slug or snail has been.  Even picking up a toy that a slug or snail has crawled into poses a risk.  So don’t leave toys in the garden overnight and regularly clean out any water bowls in the garden.
  3. Spring clean carefully – As you clean out your garages and prep your gardens, treat your fence etc.  Remember these activities may pose a risk to your pet. Fertilisers, pesticides, weed-killers, and even mulch can all be dangerous to dogs and cats.  Take care when you are putting things like this inside your garden boundaries,  where they are accessible for your pet to investigate or worse consume.
  4. When gardening, DO NOT use slug pellets to protect your plants, as these are tasty but toxic to dogs and can have fatal results.
  5. Just because the suns out doesn’t mean you should instantly take your pet out on long walks.  Your dog will be just as out of shape from winter inactivity as you are.  This is the time of year veterinarians see torn ligaments, strains and sprains, and a variety of aches and pains in dogs. Take it easy. Gradually build up strength and stamina, this is especially true in older pets.
  6. Longer days also mean pets go into “heat.”  For many stray, homeless, and neglected dogs and cats, this means unwanted litters. Animal shelters and rescue groups are typically stretched to capacity during spring.  Do what you can.  If you know someone looking for a pet, encourage adoption or rescue.
  7. It is a legal requirement for all dogs in the UK to be micro-chipped, so make sure your dog is chipped and your contact details on the microchip database are kept up to date.  Also your dog should wear a collar and tag, bearing the owner’s details whenever he is out in public.  If your dog makes a bid for freedom, beyond your garden fence, it can mean paying a sum to your local dog warden to get your pet back.
  8. The sun can be quite intense even in the Spring so do not leave dogs in cars on hot days.
  9. Plants are popping up in the spring and there are some flowers and plants which pose a danger to your pets.  Lilies are especially toxic to cats, if ingested every part of the lily came cause serious health problems and even be fatal.  For dogs – lilies, azaleas and foxglove flowers and even daffodil bulbs can present a danger to your dog.
  10. Always keep your dog on the lead in fields where there is livestock. Chances are they will have young this time of year, especially lambs. Also be aware that birds like pheasants and swans nest on the ground so don’t let your dog disturb the nests.
  11. Keep an eye on your dog in the garden as dog thefts from gardens are on the increase.  NEVER tie your dog up outside a shop – every day we see stories of dogs being stolen in this way.

What else happens in spring?Freedom beyond the fence in spring for dog walking

That’s right Easter – a time for chocolate and sweets.  Children and adults can accidentally drop these around the house, in the garden and out in public. A dogs trusty nose can sniff out a sweet treat with ease.

But here it is, its not a treat, it’s a danger – Why?

Chocolate – Chocolate, even in the smallest amounts, can cause serious health problems if ingested by a dog. The darker the chocolate, the greater the danger to the dog. Beyond the initial symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea, chocolate toxicity can lead to tremors, increased heart rate, heart failure, seizures, and in some cases, can be fatal.

Xylitol – Sugar-free candies and gum can contain large amounts of the artificial sweetener Xylitol.  Xylitol is highly toxic to some dogs and has been found to cause low blood sugar and liver failure.

Freedom For Your Dog?  Have You Checked Your Fence?

Your dog may spend longer in the garden now, so check your fencing and gates are secure both to prevent your dog escaping and to prevent your dog being stolen.

Perhaps you would prefer a specialist invisible pet fence so you have peace of mind that your beloved pet won’t escape.  They get out through open gates, dig their way out under a fence or even climb or jump over it, thereby having the freedom to roam.  Worse still your dog could end up in a road accident.

With a little foresight and planning, spring can be the best time of year for your pet. Go out in the fresh air and enjoy the freedom of spring!

 

robotic mower and dog fence with dog wearing dog collar

Dog Fences and Robotic Lawn Mowers working together

Dog fence and robotic lawn mower can they work together?

So you have a dog fence and want to buy a Robotic Lawn Mower? You’ve been online and worked out that the two products may well interfere with each other. You don’t want your dog fence to fail and equally, you don’t want grass up around your ears! You need to find a robotic mower that will work with your dog fence or vice versa?

Why do robotic mowers and dog fences interfere with each other?

Both dog fences and robotic lawn mowers use a buried wire that acts as an antenna and conducts a radio signal. An electromagnetic signal field is created around the cable. All but one dog fence systems use an AM radio frequency. This is the issue with installing both robotic mowers and dog fences next to each other. As with a magnet when you bring the same poles together they repel the signal. If no signal is being emitted one or other of the units will not work.

Are there any robotic mowers and dog fences that will work in harmony?

Yes, there is one brand of dog fence that will work with most robotic lawn mowers. The DogWatch brand which is sold by DogFence in the UK is the only system that will work in close proximity with a robotic lawnmower without interference. We have noted from experience that the cheaper brands of robotic mower tend to be more prone to interference than the Premium brands. Similarly, cheaper dog fences are highly susceptible to false activation from all sorts of household objects.

The DogWatch system uses a Digital FM signal on either 4 or 8 kHz. These frequencies are very low and the FM signal is much less prone to false activation. AM frequencies are very susceptible to noise. Notably, noise affects amplitude which is where information is stored with an AM signal (AM = Amplitude Modulation). With an FM signal (Frequency Modulation) the signal is transmitted through frequency modulation and not amplitude. Noise-based interference is a common issue for AM dog fences.

What happens when there is interference with the robotic mower and the dog fence?

With our DogFence the robotic mower will not cause any loss of signal or false activation to your dog’s fence collar. If in the event there was any interference it would be the mower that would be affected. In these cases, the robotic mower tries to read the dog fence signal and becomes confused (poor thing!).

Moving the boundary wire may help the situation. Depending on which brand of mower you choose you may have to keep a little gap between the dog fence and the robotic mower boundary wires.  Our Dog Fences can be re-programmed by the owner to either frequency and as a general rule, this eliminates any interference issues.

To date, we have had very good success with the following products when used in close proximity.

robotic lawn mower husqvarna

Husqvarna works well with DogFence

Husqvarna

Robomow

If you would are interested in purchasing either a robotic lawn mower or dog fence and have any technical questions please call us on 01628 476475.

 

sheep grazing keep dogs on lead to stop dog sheep chasing sign

Escaping dogs in the country are a danger to sheep

Solutions to stop a dog chasing sheep

It’s getting to that time of year when the wildlife is waking up. In early Spring our most common call is I am concerned about my dog getting out and chasing sheep or livestock. Usually owners have tried everything, plugged the hedge, lifted the fence height and all to no avail. If a dog has a high interest in Sheep and has had no training sooner or later he or she will be in with the sheep. For some dogs it’s just the chase, for others it’s the kill. Also a dog with a high prey drive will probably have a high interest in cats or other livestock.

What are the penalties for a dog chasing sheep?

  • Ultimately his life – the farmer has the right to shoot if he considers that the dog is a threat to his flock and there are no reasonable means of preventing it.dog chasing sheep

So What steps can an owner take to prevent their dog chasing sheep?

  • Training – find a good trainer that has a proven track record in this field of expertise (see list below). As Company we recommend a Balanced Trainer. A Balanced Trainer will use multiple tools to train the dog, including an e-collar if necessary.
  • Ensure that the garden fencing is dog proof. If you are rural, even if you don’t have livestock nearby make sure your fence is secure. The wildlife may tempt him out but ultimately he may end up in trouble with a farmer or a vehicle.
  • Walking the dog on a lead where sheep are present. It’s good practice, no matter how good your dog is if there are sheep around pop him on a lead for a few minutes.

Training for sheep chasing

  • Balanced dog trainers will use a range of tools and methods to modify the dog’s behaviour and desire sheep. They will work with you and your dog in a controlled situation and will modify the dog’s desire and interest to chase sheep.
  • Many old school farmers will advocate putting the dog in a pen with an older Ewe. This can be a risky move as a large Ewe can cause considerable damage to a dog when cornered. It is most certainly a harsh method but may ultimately save the dogs life.
  • Some Trainers recommend reward only training. Many dogs will recall well in normal situations using this training method. The issue is if you have a dog with a high drive usually the treat is insufficient to divert the attention and so this method not always successful for sheep chasing.

How can I make my rural property dog proof?

  • Deer or stock fencing may be a solution but can be costly and unsightly. It is also not always effective as dogs will climb up and over or dig under the fence.
  • Electronic dog fences are a great solution as they will back up your current fencing.

Are Electronic Fences banned?

No, electronic fences are not banned and have not been included in the recent e-collar ban proposals. Electronic fences are a great way to give your dog freedom but also keep them safe in the garden. Unlike traditional fences if the dog is trained correctly then the fence will keep even the keenest dog at home. Interestingly, a dog fence can also often be installed on terrain that is not suitable for traditional fencing. A dog fence, often referred to as an electric dog fence, will also cover driveways and vulnerable open areas.

The word “electric” is actually incorrect as there is no electricity in the cable or the collar. As with an e-collar, it is a static impulse that is generated, very similar to a Tens machine. When a dog is trained to an “electric dog fence” he is conditioned to respond a warning beep. The training is gentle and effective, with many owners asking “when will he get the shock?” only to be told that the dog has already received the stimulation.

DogFence Ltd have been installing the hidden dog fences for over 16 years. We have fenced and contained many dogs on their last chance saloon. We offer a containment promise with our Professional Dog Fences but as with all dog ownership this does involve management from the owner.

  1. Put the collar on the dog every day – it’s useless in the draw!
  2. Make sure the collar is correctly fitted – a lose collar can equal a lose dog!
  3. Remember to change the battery at the correct interval – DogFence batteries last 6 months or 2 years depending on the collar and we even offer automatic renewal programmes so you don’t forget.

Conclusion

The majority of dog owners recognise that dogs need to be trained so that they can enjoy walking together. Sadly owners cannot be present 24/7 and it maybe that the dog escapes from the garden and ends up in a field full of sheep. Installing an electronic dog fence gives owners peace of mind whilst allowing the dog the freedom to enjoy the open air.

If you would like to know more about how DogFence can secure your garden give us a buzz. Our lovely office team can measure out your boundary and give options for the fence remotely. Call us today on 01628 476475 or click here for a quote.

Below is a list of Balanced Dog Trainers that we recommend for sheep chasing:

Take The Lead Training – Devon  – Jamie Penrith.

Dutiful Dogs – London & South East England – Nicky Bulter

Southend Dog Training – Essex – Adam Spivey

Paws in Nature – Cheshire – Andrew Lang

 

 

fencing for dogs

Fencing for dogs we explore the options for dog owners

Best fencing for dogs – what are the options?

When is comes to fencing for dogs it really depends on several important points. A big dog will need a big fence. A four foot fence is nothing to a big dog. Equally small dogs are excellent climbers. It is important to consider the dog breed when choosing a fence. Below are some points to consider when finding the best solution for your dog and environment. All dogs are different, your dog may be fine in your present home and then you move and something changes.  Ask yourself the following before choosing your dog fencing solution.

  1. Do you live in an urban area?
  2. Are you rural?
  3. What fencing do you currently have?
  4. What breed of dog do you have?
  5. Is the dog currently escaping?
  6. What size area requires fencing?

Below we have noted some of the most popular forms of fencing for dogs so that Fido stays safe at home where he should be!

Types of fencing for dogs

Chain Link Fences

Arguably this is not the prettiest type of fencing but it is one of the most economical. Chain link fencing can be built to varying heights and can also be used to construct a dog run or pen. The issue chain link dog fencing being climbed by dogthat people often have with chain link fencing is that other larger wild animals (foxes and badgers) can cause damage to this type of fence.  When the fence is damaged this gives the dog  an open avenue to the outside worldwide.

Interestingly Terriers are particularly good climbers and often see chain link fences as an easy ladder to escape. the lovely links make great foot holds for both large and small dogs. Chain link fences tend to be a popular choice for more rural customers as they can be softened with foliage. If you have a large breed of dog the fence height should be a minimum of 6ft to prevent a “climb out”.

Close Board Wooden Fences

This is probably the most popular type of fencing for urban areas. A Close Board fence can be a good option because the dog cannot see the rabbits and squirrels living on the other-side! This may curtail his desire to wander but in some cases can increase anxiety. If a dog can hear but not see what is the other side of the fence this may increase his territorial behavior and lead to excessive barking.

When it comes to fencing it’s a mid priced option if you have a small town garden. This type of fencing for dogs is usually sufficient but if your dog is a digger or a climber then this may not be the best solution. A 6ft close board fence is usually only installed in the rear of the garden so you may have to look at other options for the front of the property. Take note if your dog is a digger you should also concrete below ground!

Stock  and Deer Fencing

Stocking and Deer fencing is usually only installed on large rural properties. When installing this type of fencing it is usually best to get the fence dug into the ground to prevent the dog and wildlife digging under it. This can be a costly exercise for large areas and depending on the breed may need to be quite high to prevent a “climb out”. Stock fences can be installed in front of hedges to give a secondary barrier. If you have a very small dog then a stock fence will be ineffective as the dog can squeeze through the wire.

Electronic dog fence

Incredibly, this type of fencing for dogs has been around for over 40 years. It is a little known fencing solution for dog owners in the UK but widely used in the USA. The advantage of an electronic dog fence is that it can be used on both large or small properties. The electronic dog fence is invisible and so does not create any unsightly barriers. There are several advantages that electronic fencing has over traditional methods.

  1. The dog cannot dig under or jumper over the electronic dog fence.
  2. It is cheaper than traditional fences.
  3. Does not obstruct views and is not unsightly.
  4. Can be taken with you if you move.
  5. Protects the drive even if the gate is open.

Even on most standard urban gardens and electronic dog fence is a most cost effective solution. It is simple to install and offers a safe and effective solution. Having been rigorously tested by Lincoln University these fences are have been proved safe and effective.

If you are intrigued but think how our fence may not work for you why not read some of our customer testimonials. If you would like to know more our experienced professionals can chat to you. We can then put together a bespoke estimate for your dog, property and budget.

For an  for an estimate call or contact DogFence on 03450 623623 or info@dogfence.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

dog fence boundary flags with dog in training

Electronic dog fence – How to train your dog.

Simple Steps for training your dog to an electronic dog fence

Before commencing electronic dog fence training:

  1. Ensure that you have the correct amount of training flags to cover the boundary. The training flags are the most important part of the training protocol for electronic dog fences. The training flags should be placed approx 8 – 10ft apart around the boundary. Use the collar to find the edge of the avoidance zone and place the flag in the ground in the area where the collar starts to beep.white electronic dog fence flags are placed around the boundary to give the dog a visual
  2. Using the dog fence tester – set the collar to beep only mode. This means that the collar will not give out an impulse just an audible tone.
  3. Place the electronic dog fence collar on the dog and check that it correctly adjusted. As a guide you should be able to get 2 fingers in the neck strap when the dog’s neck is down. See our Trouble Shooting page for handy tips.
  4. Leave the collar on the dog for at least 30 mins before commencing the initial training session.
  5. Find a long lead – 6ft and ideally not the dog’s usual walking lead.

Commencing the training

  1. Take the dog outside on the lead.
  2. Walk the dog around the boundary and tap the flag so that there is good movement.
  3. As you tap each flag use a command word – a good example is “Watch out”.
  4. Allow the dog to go past the training flags into the correction zone (this is the area of the electronic dog fence where the collar will give both a beep and impulse). Allow the dog to linger here and hear the warning beep then direct him back into the garden. Use the command word and tap the flag again.
  5. Repeat this around the boundary for several small sessions over 1 – 2 days.

Introduction to Correction

  1. Place the electronic dog fence collar on the dog approx 20 – 30 mins before starting the training.
  2. Using the tester – lift the level on the receiver from level 0 (beep only) to level 1.
  3. Repeat the process of walking around the boundary and tapping the flags. Always use the command word when tapping the flag.
  4. Allow the dog to go past the flags into the avoidance zone. Look for any signs that the dog is feeling the impulse (a small twitch of the ear, little shake of the head).
  5. Carry on around the boundary allowing the dog to walk into the avoidance zone of his own free will. Never call or drag the dog into the electronic dog fence zone.
  6. If the dog is not responding to the level – lift the level to level 2 and repeat the process. Always direct the dog back into the safe area and praise the dog when he is back in the safe zone.
  7. Once the dog is reacting to the stimulation make a note of the level.
  8. After training play with your dog, praise him and reward him. Do not allow the dog to be off the lead in the garden during the training phase.

Introduction to Distractions

It is important the dog fully understands the warning beep and how to retreat when he is in a high drive moment. By carrying out the distraction training your dog will learn the electronic dog fence so that it becomes second nature. This will ensure that even when he is in a high drive state he stops at the warning beep. The distraction training will require 2 people.

  1. Walk around the boundary, tapping the flags and then have the new person walk into the flags and well into the avoidance area. See if the dog continues or decides to stop.
  2. If the dog continues allow him well into the zone to receive the stimulation and guide him back to you in the safe area. Give him the command word whilst guiding him back to the safe area. Praise him in the safe area.
  3. If the dog stops before or at the flags guide him back and praise him.
  4. Continue walking around the boundary and repeating the process.
  5. Once the dog is making the right decision (not walking into the flagged area) move on and try this on the driveways or open areas.
  6. If the dog is making good progress you may wish to drop the lead and walk into the flagged area with the companion. If the dog endeavors to follow give the command in aloud and firm voice.
  7. A good indication that the dog is fully at home with the electronic dog fence is when he looks away from the flags.

Repeat this process over a couple of days.

Letting your dog off the lead

  1. Walk the dog around a couple of areas and tap the flag if possible. Usually by this stage the dog will not venture near the flags so just give the command word even if you are several feet away from the flag.
  2. Go to the centre of the property and face the dog away from boundary.
  3. Remove the lead and start to walk back towards the house or a safe area.
  4. Play with your dog outside – you can roll a ball but always roll away from the avoidance zone.
  5. Do not leave the dog unsupervised in the garden for the first few days.
  6. After 14 days you can start to remove the flags. Remove the flags every other flag, every other day until they are gone.

Keep the flags in a safe place as if you wish to add on another pet you will need to re-flag the boundary and if you change the layout this will need to be re-flagged to give the dog a visual.

Points To Remember

Training your dog to the electronic dog fence should be fun!

Never throw a stick or ball into the avoidance zone.

Small bit size sessions are often better.

Always remove the dog fence collar at night or for a period of 8 hours in every 24 hour period.

Check the fit for your electronic dog fence collar regularly.

Check the battery status on your collar monthly (using the tester supplied).

DogFence Ltd are the largest installers of electronic dog fences in the UK. Our professional installer/trainers can set up your dog fence for you and will train your pet to the system. We also offer a post installation service to train new pets to the system. If you would like more information please call us on 01628 476475 or email info@dogfence.co.uk.

 

 

 

 

a dog is for life - retriever puppy in santa hat

A dog is for life!

A dog is for life – t’was the month before Xmas

T’was a month before Christmas and all around the house the children were squealing we want a pet mouse;
Or a hamster, a kitten, a dog or a horse. We PROMISE to look after it forever, of course!

So straight onto Google the parents they went; looking for puppies from Carmarthen to Kent.
A Springer, a Boxer, a Cocker or Lab. A puppy t’was decided would be incredibly Fab.

On the week before Christmas, the puppy came home.
To shouts of excitement and can I give him a bone? a dog is for life - retriever puppy sleeping

All soft and adorable with huge puppy eyes.
But all through the night for his mother he cries.

The children were sad; does he not love us dear Mum
We thought he’d be bouncy and all full of fun!

He poohed on the floor and chewed up their toys.
He barked and whimpered and made a strange noise.

He peed on carpet and jumped on the beds
and by morning the family had their hands in their heads!

Who knew having a puppy could cause so much stress,
We just weren’t prepared for all of this mess!

But puppies like children seem rather demanding
and puppies need training and words of commanding.

Oh what shall we do? shall we keep him or not?
Just send him away and be forever forgot?

Shall we contact a trainer, who knows what they’re doing,
Perhaps they can help with the peeing and poohing.

Should we have taken better advice,
looked at the kitten or the little white mice?

But all pets have needs whatever they be;
Whether they’re fluffy or furry or really scaly!

The family decided to stick with this boy
and after seeking some help, they were rewarded with joy!

A happy, loyal friend who’s been loved and adored,
A playmate forever so the kids were not bored.

Now he is old, smelly and grey
And the family have loved him for many a daya dog is for life - old retriever

He’s been there through trauma, sadness and sorrow
and given his love for today and tomorrow.

And when he is gone the family will hurt
As the memories of Archie cannot be usurped.

So remember this Christmas a dog is for life,
he’ll poo on your floor but he will change your life.

Sam Chapman – DogFence Ltd

 

dog fence ideas - dog with question mark

Dog Fencing Ideas, How To Decide

When you are researching for dog fencing ideas you will see there are many different types of dog fencing from standard fencing to electronic or even invisible fencing options.

Why Do You Need A Fence?

Most pet owners, at some point, have an issue with a dog that likes to take themselves for a walk; loves to jump the back fence (even if its 6ft tall) or is a serial digger, who can move soil like you’ve never seen before. A dog will quite happy at escape in search of things to chase, other people meet or jump up, pets to socialise with or simply because they feel its time for a walk.

Not all people like dogs, they could be frightened of a dog who is roaming without it’s owner.  As a pet owner it is your responsibility to ensure not only the safety of your dog but the risk an escaped dog poses to others. This is not to say that your pet is vicious and will attack. Most likely too friendly and may knock someone over or has no road sense and causes an accident.

The Positives of Fencing:

  • Your pet is safe from harm.
  • Other people are safe from your pet.
  • No paying the dog warden to get your pet back which are over £50 a time can mount up, especially if you have a frequent escape artist.
  • Unexpected vet bills, will not be due to injury or poisoning or worse being shot by a farmer.
  • No unexpected puppies, if your dog has not been spade or neutered.
  • You don’t end up having to pay for others vet bills for another injured animal.
  • Peace of mind that your pet cannot escape.

Dog Fencing Idea’s

Wooden Panel Dog Fencing Ideas

What height do you need 3ft, 4ft, 6ft – wooden panel fencing may well look like it provides a secure area but other than the fence posts, the panels sit above ground. The enables a dog to dig their way out under a wooden fence. Or perhaps your pet is energetic, can jump high – is a 6ft fence going to hold them back? Maybe you have a 3ft fence and are considering a higher one? What will this do for a dog that can jump? The answer is simple, it will only teach them to jump higher and higher. It’s better to start high so you do not have to foot the bill to replace fencing panels trying to retain your pet.

You may also need to place obstacles to deter jumping or plant bushes, or you can pay out even more money for an angled roof section which slopes inwards at the top of your fence. To maintain a wooden fence costs money and effort; wood treatment to stop rotting or repairs from weather damage.

This option can be quite costly to you and you cannot leave your dog unattended in a fenced garden.

Wire Mesh Dog Fencing Ideas

One word – Barking – caused by barrier frustration that your dog can see others and is either guarding or demanding their attention as they pass by. Of course a dog left out all day can boredom bark and a wire mesh fence allows for others who cannot stand the barking to opportunity to be able to tease, release, injure or even poison your pet, yes this does happen!

Dogs do bark when they hear things, but more so when they can also see but feel enclosed they try to alert their owner to someone else’s visual presence. It can also cause fence running due to frustration. To combat this you would not be able to leave your dog unattended in a fenced garden.

Chaining Your Dog Up

This is a recipe for aggression and lack of exercise for your pet. Unable to seek shelter from weather unless you invest in the cost of building a shelter for them. I guess the question you need to ask if you are even thinking of this is would you like to be chained up for long periods of time? This is not really a freedom fence or a fair form of containment.

Wireless Dog Fencing Ideas

And so we have the solution……the inescapable fence – or is it?

Well the answer depends on what type of wireless fence system you go for:

The AM Frequency Wireless Dog Fence:

  • Many household appliances including televisions, WiFi, computer monitors, light dimmers, motors etc emit a noise based signal that AM receivers “hear” and incorrectly acknowledge as their own signal, triggering an unwanted response.
  • AM receivers can be confused and accidentally trigger as the receiver assumes the signal is correct.
  • AM systems use two signals, to try to alleviate the problem, but this slows the reaction time down.  On both the start up and shut off time on the receiver.  This is why dogs and cats can “out run” the signal on AM systems.  The pet also continues to be corrected with shocks from their collar, when outside the fencing zone.
  • The AM signal is usually pulsed using an on/off transmission, however when in the off state is where interference with other AM signals can occur causing the receiver to miss the total signal.
  • False activation can happen because AM receivers do not ignore all noise based signals.
  • Pets are able to run through an AM signal and then most AM systems continue to shock your pet over and over once outside the boundary.

The FM Frequency Legal Wireless Dog Fence:

    • A safer an quicker than AM and ignores AM signals
    • A secure digital signal, which ensures no interference is received.
    • FM receivers only hear their own transmission so no false activation occurs especially where patented Safelink technology is used.
    • The FM transmission is a fast signal and more energy efficient.
    • FM signals can work in electrical noise environments.
    • Transmitters can be used near or against electrical appliances.
    • The output power remains constant.
    • Wireless dog fences transmitters can be attached to metal or stock fencing, without signal loss.
    • The FM signal eliminates the risk of false correction and necessary shocks to your pet.
    • The FM frequency hidden dog fence provides an uncross able barrier for your pet.
    • The shock collar has a safety cut-off, this ensures there is no continuous shocks delivery, in the unlikely event of a boundary breach.
    • Costs a fraction of the price of alternative fencing ideas.

To conclude the best dog fencing idea if you want to ensure your pet cannot escape into harms way is to opt for an FM frequency wireless fence. Dog Fence have provided this system to tens of thousands of pet owners throughout the UK. If you are serious about keeping your pet safe and happy with the freedom of an invisible fence take the time to have a conversation with the team at Dog Fence by getting in touch today.