dog in run - no containment fence here

The Containment Fence Myth – truth or lies lets learn more

The truth about containment fences – the myths unraveled!

You’ve most likely heard more than one containment fence myth. There are not many products that are surrounded with such controversy or misunderstanding. People who have never seen or even used a containment fence will often feel qualified to repeat the rhetoric they have read. So let’s look at some of the myths and answer them honestly and frankly.

Containment Fence collars can hurt your pet and cause pain, fear, and distress.

Incorrect – modern fence collars are completely adjustable and can offer levels that are virtually undetectable even to human skin. It is true that the early collars (some 40 years ago) generated a high-level shock but as with all technology things have moved on considerably. Many owners will try the collar before using it on the dog and a popular response is “how will that keep my dog in?” The training aspect of the fence means that most owners will ask when the dog is going to receive the shock. They are then “shocked” when they learn that dog has already received the activation. Contrary to popular belief the dog does not leap into arms of the owner screaming and for most dogs, the flags are the scariest part of the fence.

Fence collars are like electrocuting your dog.

Incorrect. The truth is that a fence collar is very similar to a Tens machine that humans use for physio and pain relief.  Studies have proved that there is no harm done to your pet. The “shock” that is delivered is actually a small static impulse and it too low to be classed as a shock.

Containment fence collars burn dogs and cats.

Lie – It is physically impossible for a containment fence collar to burn a cat, dog or human. Actually, they don’t generate any heat and are incapable of causing a burn. If you want to put it to the test take a thin piece of paper and try to light it with a fence collar or even an e-collar.

“I’ve seen the burn marks!”  No, what you’ve seen is pressure necrosis. Pressure sores are caused when the collar is left on the pet for too long. The collar must be removed for a minimum of 8 hours in every 24 hour period.

The dog fence collar will electrocute my dog if it gets wet

False, the fence collars are designed to be waterproof. In actual fact, if the dog swims in the collar and the coat is wet the impulse is dissipated across the fur. So in actual fact, a fence collar is less effective if the dog is wet.

Containment Fences are used by lazy people who can’t be bothered to train their dogs!

Those that are against containment fences will often throw this one into the hat. So let’s answer this with a few common reasons why people use containment fences:

dog chained up no containment fence here

A chain is cheaper than a containment fence.

  • You can’t train a cat to stay at home. Cats can climb and without creating a prison it is virtually impossible to contain a cat in a rural garden.
  • Most people enquiring about a containment fence have spent hours and hundreds of £’s, maybe even thousands, trying to contain their pets – a containment fence is often the last resort. The lure of the livestock or vermin outside is too strong. Pushing through brambles must be painful –  if they are in “the red mist mode” they will go.
  • Some dogs have a very high prey drive and are driven to hunt. Positive only training will not always work for all dogs.
  • The dog was on their “last chance saloon” because the farmer or gamekeeper has threatened to shoot him.
  • Most Professionally installed containment fences cost over £1000 – a cheaper option would be to lock the dog away or chain him up. People that install containment fences want their pets to have freedom but keep them safe at the same time.
  • The owner received a call after their pet was injured on the road.

Dog and cat fences often destroy the relationship between the owner and their pets

Interestingly, the Lincoln report proved that cat owners that used a containment fence had a closer relationship with their cats. This is probably because the cats are not allowed to wander but are content as they have access to the outside to display normal feline behaviors. Many dog owners report that their dogs are calmer once they are contained with an invisible dog fence. Again, this is probably because they are not locked away but are allowed free access to roam within a boundary and are able to just be dogs!

Invisible Fences are only for aggressive dogs

This is 100% incorrect an invisible fence should never be used for an aggressive dog. The fence is an invisible barrier and works in a subtle and gentle way. If a dog has a history of aggression he or she is not a suitable candidate for an invisible dog fence.

People that use electronic pet fences want to hurt dogs and cats

Our experience is the complete opposite. Folks who use containment fences are passionate about keeping their pets safe. Our customers range from ordinary families to vets, dog trainers, cat and dog rescue customers. Sadistic people will always inflict cruelty on animals but they will rarely spend money to do so. We have had owners that have said that they could never have had another cat or dog had it not been for the fence. The pain of having a pet injured or killed on the roads was too much to stand.

Conclusion

There will always be the “keyboard warriors” who are happy to spout rhetoric. When we come up against the propaganda we offer a simple invitation – “come and see for yourself, watch a dog or a cat in training or come and visit our dogs and cats and see for yourself. Afterall seeing is believing and what can’t speak can’t lie. To date, we have never had a single uptake for our invitation. The usual response is I don’t want to see or be a part of this. To those people we say:

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won’t come in.”
― Isaac Asimov

We truly believe that if someone who is skeptical can be open-minded and meet with us they will learn. What they will see is that we offer a good life for dogs, cats and their owners. Indeed the UK Government decided this was the case in August 2018. After listening to containment fence users and meeting with us they concluded that containment fences save pets lives.

“However, after listening closely to the views of pet owners and respondents, the Government will not extend the ban to invisible fencing systems which can keep pets away from roads and potential traffic accidents. These devices are particularly useful for cat owners and animals often respond well to invisible fencing and quickly learn to stay within a boundary without receiving a static pulse.”

If you would like to know more about how a containment fence could work for you please call us – 01628 476475 or contact us for a bespoke estimate here.

Links: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/animal-welfare-banning-the-use-of-electronic-training-collars-for-cats-and-dogs

 

 

Invisible Fence - Dog Die In Hot Cars!

Risk a fine up to £20,000 for leaving dogs in hot cars!

Car owners are being urged not to leave their dog in the car on a hot day as it could land you some huge fines and other punishments.

UK motorists are being warned to not leave their dog unattended in a car on a hot day. Authorities urge you to keep animals safe and comfortable on car journeys and not in any danger.Invisible Fence - Dog Die In Hot Cars!

Over the summer months, humid conditions in the UK could send temperatures soaring to as high as 38 degrees Celsius.

Road safety officers warn that it’s both dangerous and illegal to leave an animal in a hot vehicle. Yet still we are seeing posts and videos on Facebook of dogs being rescued from hot cars!

If a dog becomes ill or dies, the owner is likely to face a charge of animal cruelty under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. This offence can bring a prison sentence of up to six months in custody and/or a fine of up to £20,000.

 

Dog Safety – Motorist Guidelines:

  1. Leave your dog at home on warm days.
  2. If you do need to transport your dog, bring plenty of fresh drinking water, and a bowl. Ensure your dog is able to stay cool on a journey.
  3. Don’t let your dog travel unrestrained. Use of a crate or seat belts and travel harnesses is advised. Not buckling up your pet in the car could land you with a £5,000 fine and invalidate your insurance!
  4. If you suspect your dog might be too hot.  You will need to stop somewhere safe for a good drink of water. Animals are unable to sweat in the way that humans can. Dogs cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paws.
  5. If you have left your dog in the car on a hot day.  Be aware it only takes a few minutes to succumb to the symptoms of heatstroke.
  6. If you suspect your dog is developing heatstroke on a journey, stop somewhere safe and take into the shade or to somewhere cool. However, if signs of heat exhaustion become apparent (for example excessive thirst, heavy panting, rapid pulse, fever, vomiting, glazed eyes, dizziness), you should go straight to a vet.
  7. If you see a pet in a vehicle on a hot day, take immediate action. For example, if you’re in a supermarket, roadside service area or garden centre car park, note the car make, model, colour and registration number.  Go inside and ask for an announcement to be made. If this doesn’t bring the owner out, or you’re in a location where finding the owner is impossible, then dial 999 and ask for the police.

Leaving a dog or any pet for that matter is extremely dangerous!

People believe that it is okay to leave a dog in a car on a warm day.  Windows are left open or the car is parked in the shade. The truth is, it’s still a very dangerous situation for a dog.

A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly.  Even when it doesn’t feel that warm to you, there is danger to your dog.  If it iss 22 degrees outside, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within an hour.

It is best to leave your dog at home. If your dog is left outside, make sure there is plenty of shade, water and no means of escape.

Dog Fence offers a great invisible fence solution to ensure your beloved pet remains contained within your property boundaries, when a static fence is not enough of a deterrent!

We urge you to share this post and keep the awareness going!

 

 

pet containment fence - stop adder bites for dogs who escape

UK Adder Bites – Dog Owner Warning – Pet Containment Fence

Vet warns dog owners of the risks of adder bites in warmer weather after a family dog was left fighting for his life.

Five-year-old field spaniel, is believed to have been bitten by an adder while sniffing out sand dunes in North Wales and spent almost two weeks fighting for his life at a Veterinary Hospital in Hartford.  You cannot contain your pet when out walking, especially if they are off the lead.

The venom was so toxic, it caused the skin on the abdomen to blacken, die and peel off while causing severe damage to his liver, leaving vets extremely concerned.

Veterinary surgeon, said, “Obviously, these things are very difficult to predict. It’s more about getting the message out there that it is a risk and to follow the necessary advice. Snakes are more common in some places than others, and tall grassland is a particular risk. It’s definitely something to bear in mind if you have a wandering dog.pet containment fence - stop adder bites for dogs who escape

“The majority of bitten dogs make a full recovery with appropriate treatment. However, this dog was really, really poorly when he came to us and it is only through extensive supportive liver medications, broad spectrum antibiotics and fluid therapy that he came through.

“We’ve not seen a case as severe as this before and we believe the dog had multiple bites.”

The dogs owners, were on holiday in North Wales when their pooch was suspected of being bitten while investigating a recently strimmed area of grassland close to the sand dunes. Although he continued to play and fetch his ball normally, he became lethargic when they returned home and later developed soreness and pain on his left side.

The couple sought veterinary advice on holiday and it was suspected their dog had pulled a muscle but his condition gradually deteriorated and they were forced to return to their home early.

“We were told we were not out of the woods, even with his liver enzyme levels started to come down. It really was touch and go.”

“Quite a number of people who are dog owners have no idea this can happen. Of course we don’t want to scare people but if there’s any chance a dog has been bitten you need to know what to do quickly because the symptoms might not show for one to three hours.

The dog had started to develop bruising around his groin area when he returned home from North Wales. “his bloods and his liver enzymes were through the roof.”

Snake bites in dogs are uncommon in the UK but they can occur, particularly in spring and summer and interestingly between 3pm and 4pm in the afternoon when the adders are most active.

You can identify an adder as a greyish snake, with a dark and very distinct zig-zag pattern down its back, and a red eye. Males tend to be more silvery-grey in colour, while females are more light or reddish-brown.

The message is, if you notice anything unusual, take your dog to a vet immediately. It’s better to err on the side of caution.

There are so many dangers out there for your pet, especially one who has escaped and is roaming unsupervised. As a responsible pet owner, it is important to ensure your pet is contained. Dog Fence provides a pet containment system in the form of a wireless dog fence which works on radio frequency as opposed to electric dog fences and is an effective solution for pet owners with the most cunning of escape artist dogs. Get in touch with our friendly team to discuss your needs today!

 

Please share this post to increase awareness amongst pet owners! Thank you!

Pet Containment System

Pet Containment – If Your Dog Runs Away

Our Top Tips on What To Do If Your Dog Runs Away.

Containment of a dog can be difficult at times, even more so when you are out enjoying the countryside with your pooch.

1. If you see your dog going, try to capture his attention.

Is your dog is too distracted to be off lead?

The position of ears or overall body language is an indicator of when its time to quickly clip a lead on.

However, if your dog is out of reach or has already taken a few steps in the wrong direction, your first step is to try to help him tune back in to you. Clap your hands, call his name as loudly as you can, whistle, use your most excited voice.

As counter intuitive as it sounds, run away from your dog. This may make him think you’re playing a game and he may chase you.

If your dog does come back to you, reward that. Clip a lead on and immediately give scratches and pats. Tell him he’s such a good boy. You want to recognise the correct behaviour—that he came to you. This is not a moment to punish him for running away.

Pet Containment System

2. Leave something of yours where you last saw your dog.

If your dog runs away in the forest leave your coat in the woods.  Come back the next morning or at the end of the day, your dog might be curled up on your coat  The familiar scent attracts the dog and gives a temporary home base.

3. Spread Out

You want to look for the dog, and will walk and walk and call and call until you find him. Get a group together and all do the same thing. Everyone takes a different route and walks out, calling for the missing dog. In this scenario, it’s helpful to have everyone’s phone numbers so that you can call off the search if someone finds the dog.

4. Wait where you are.

Inaction may not be your first instinct, but in my experience, a dog usually hasn’t actually run away. Just gone on his own adventure for a little while but will come back to the trail.

A dogs comfort zone can be up to 10 minutes long.  Initially, stand on the trail and wait for him to come back.

5. Can your dog can be identified.

Ensure your dog  never goes outside without his collar and tags. His tag should have name, home phone number and mobile number.

The times dogs haves been caught by strangers who have immediately called the numbers on the tags, and enabled pick up right away is a tried and tested means when it comes to your pet wearing a tag.

Be aware that sometimes, your dog may become separated from his collar. All dogs should have a microchip, to identify and  associate with all of your contact numbers. The mobile number is important because it may be that you are not always at home.

6. Trust your dog.

Knowing a regular walking route very well may mean your dog could find his own way home.

7. Contact all the shelters and pounds within several miles.

If you do not find your dog within a certain amount of time, obviously you will start contacting the local dog warden/shelters in your area.

It’s a good idea to contact the shelters within a large range such as the next town or county over in all directions or even further. A dog can be turned into a shelter over 50 miles from where they were last seen.

This could be because the dog covered a large distance or because the people who found the dog drove quite a ways to a shelter.

The point is, contact all the shelters in your region and keep contacting them. Often.

8. Have a recent photo of your dog on hand.

Keep a recent photo of your pet on your phone or by email that you can easily pass along to animal control, use on social media or put on posters.

Losing your dog is scary no matter where you are. As dog owners, we want to do everything we can to prevent this dangerous, anxious scenario. However, if the worst happens, I hope that these tips on what to do if your dog runs away will help you reunite with your dog.

The same is true for a dog who has escaped the garden, unlike on a walk, you can manage and stop garden escapes by the use of our invisible fence pet containment system.

 

 

Keep Your Dog Cool This Summer

Many people don’t let their dogs in on the fun because they’re worried about the heat and more.  There is Good news!  Your four-legged friend can enjoy the great outdoors if you follow these key tips for keeping dogs cool and safe.

Keep Your Dog Hydrated

Keeping dogs cool in summer requires having plenty of water on hand. One of the easiest ways to keep your dog cool and hydrated is to carry a portable, collapsible water bowl and bottles of cold water when you go out.  Make sure your dog drinks Invisible Fence - Keep Dogs Cool In Summerwater every hour. If your dog starts panting excessively, get him into the shade and offer more water right away.

Get your dog wet

One way to keep your dog cool during outdoor gatherings is to allow him to swim or do other water play activities.  Always check out a venue ahead of time to determine what water options are available for your dog.  It’s also a good idea to bring a few old towels along to dry your dog after play.

Keep your dog out of the midday heat

Avoid exercising with your dog on those hotter days, and if you must, at least avoid the midday hours or anytime it seems too hot for yourself. When going for a walk, avoid hot asphalt that can burn your pet’s paws, keep running to a minimum, and bring plenty of cold water to hydrate and cool your dog.

Keep your dog out of a parked car

With all the tragic stories in the news, this should go without saying — but you should never ever leave your dog in a parked car, not even for a moment. According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Cars parked in direct sunlight can reach internal temperatures up to 131°F-172°F when it’s 80°F-100°F outside.” Even with the windows cracked, temperatures rise quickly – hot enough to cause irreversible organ damage or even death.

Keep your dog out of the dog house

Dog houses aren’t safe in hot weather, because they block air flow and trap the heat inside. If your pet is outside, be sure to keep him or her in the shade when possible, with plenty of water on hand. You can add ice to their water bowl if it’s especially hot to help keep your dog cool when he’s outside.

Know the signs of heatstroke in dogs and what to do

Heatstroke is a serious hazard for dogs on hot days, especially those who are very young or old, or not in good health. Watch for the following signs of heatstroke in your dog:

  • Excessive panting and salivating
  • Obvious discomfort
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Disorientation
  • Seizures

If you see any of these signs in your dog, move him or her into a cooler environment right away and call your vet. You can use ice packs and give your pet some cool water to alleviate the condition until you get to the vets.

Many of the complications from heatstroke do not begin to appear until several days after the incident — but prompt veterinary care can potentially prevent or treat some of these complications.

So, when you and your four-legged best friend head out this summer, remember these important tips for keeping dogs cool outside.   If your dog tends to escape the garden you cannot ensure they are cool when out adventuring without you, it is ideal to invest in an invisible fence system when a static fence does not suffice.

Fencing For Dogs – Digging Dogs

Fencing for dogs is a key factor, when you create a colourful garden full of plants and flowers. Does your dog undo all your hard work by digging unsightly holes?

If you value a beautiful garden, this can be a frustrating problem. Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take that will usually stop a digging dog, once you understand why your dog digs in the first place.

Dogs can dig holes in the garden for a variety of reasons.

Some types of dogs seem to have an inherent tendency to dig. One such breed is the Terrier family of dogs. The tendency to dig is almost innate to the Terrier since they were bred to hunt animals buried in burrows. If you’re dealing with a digging Terrier, you have a bit more off a challenge than you would with other dog breeds. Fencing for these dogs to keep them contained can prove to be a challenge. Other reasons dogs dig are to create a cool spot to lie down in on a hot summer day, to escape underneath a fence, and digging to stay entertained and stimulated.

To stop a digging dog, first try to determine why the behaviour is occurring.

Digging in an attempt to escape your fencing?Fencing For Dogs - Stop Dogs Digging

If this is happening when you’re away from home, he could be suffering from separation anxiety and is attempting to get under the fence to find you. This type of situation is most easily resolved by bringing your dog inside when you go out and leaving him in a secure area with soft, relaxing music or a T.V. playing in the background.

If your dog’s anxiety causes him to be destructive indoors when you leave, consider securing him in a cage. Contrary to what you might think, many dogs actually enjoy the security of a comfortable, well padded cage when kept there for short periods of time.

A male dog may also dig under a fence when he detects the scent of a female in heat. Having your pet neutered may reduce this motivation for digging. You may also want to reinforce the boundaries of the fence at the base using chicken wire.

Is your dog digging because he’s trying to get cool?

Make sure your dog has a cool shelter located in a shady area where he can escape the heat along with plenty of water. You may also want to consider adding a wading pool filled with shallow water for your dog to use for cooling. Choose a heavy duty plastic one as a dog can puncture an inflatable one with their toenails.

You may also want to have your dog’s hair cut shorter during the summer months and tie a special cooling bandanna around his neck. These are available online.

Is your dog fence digging out of boredom?

To stop a bored dog from digging, make sure he has plenty of daily exercise and mental stimulation when he’s alone in the garden. Provide him with safe toys that aren’t likely to cause choking. A summertime wading pool can be a pleasant and cool diversion that will keep your dog from creating havoc with his paws.

Taking your dog for a brisk thirty minute walk can dissipate some of his excess energy that might otherwise be channelled into digging.

If these strategies don’t work, try using a water gun to spray your dog on the head when you notice him digging. If you do this several times, you’ll probably extinguish the behaviour. The trick is to catch your dog in the act and have the water gun ready to work its magic. Never punish a dog after the fact as this is only counterproductive.

With a little patience, you can stop a digging dog and restore your garden to its former state of tranquillity. When your digging pooch is trying to escape the garden, a great solution is to install a pet containment system, this is the perfect solution when choosing fencing for dogs.

stop dogs escaping from garden

Dogs and Fences – Do They Go Together?

A good fence will keep your dog inside your garden and other dogs (and other dangers) out of your garden. Unfortunately, many dogs look at a fence as a challenge to surmount. They want to dig under it, go through it, or climb over it.

Since the point of a fence is not to create a puzzle for your dog to solve! Let’s look at some ways to keep your dog inside your fence:

Remove Aids to Escape

It is amazing what dogs can use to their benefit when trying to escape from the garden.

  • A bin can stored next to the fence becomes a climbing aid; a step stool.
  • Firewood piled next to a fence does the same thing; it’s easy to climb up on firewood then hop or climb the fence.
  • A tree with a low limb hanging over the fence is also an avenue to escape.

Walk around your garden and look at everything from your dog’s point of view.  Then remove all of those climbing aids.

Stop Fence Tunnellers

Dogs who dig under a fence to escape can be persistent. Filling in each hole, won’t stop a dog from digging and can be frustrating as a never ending chore. Therefore a more permanent solution works better.

The best solution is to create a L-footer along the base of the fence. Take a roll of heavy garden fence or hardware cloth (wire fencing with wire squares) and unroll it alongside your fence. Bend the fencing so a foot of it can be attached to your fence and the remainder will lie flat on the ground at the base of the fence extending into your garden.

The name, L-fence, describes the L shape of the fencing once it’s shaped. The base of the L can be staked to the ground, covered with dirt, gravel, rocks, or just let the grass grow up through it. If you let the grass grow, remember it and don’t mow over it; cut it using other, safer means.

Stop Fence Jumpers

If your dog likes to jump the fence, create a L-footer but turn it upside down so it’s at the top of your fence. Create that L-shape and fasten the short side to the top of your fence with the rest of the garden or hardware fencing angled into your garden at the top of the fence so when your dog looks up, fencing is above.

You’ll need to use some ingenuity to anchor this fencing though. You can use some wood to create supports anchored to the top of your fence.  These will support the folded over garden fence or large angle irons or even metal shelf supports. Take a look at your fence and use your imagination.

Of course, we have to give our pooches credit for the clever ways they can escape and once they find a way out they will use it again and again if not blocked.

There is one surefire way to effectively contain your dog, which is also aesthetically pleasing with or without a static boundary fence and that is through the use of a wireless dog fence system, read more about the Dog Fence system or get in touch with us to discuss your needs.

electronic dog fence installation info graphic

Electronic dog fence – FAQ’s for new customers

So you found our electronic dog fence online and made an enquiry. We don’t need to visit your property to give you an estimate. Using our online mapping tool, similar to google earth, we can locate your property and measure out your boundary. Our office team will usually try to contact you as well to chat through your questions and discuss any areas of the property that might need extra attention.

Booking a dog fence installation

Booking your dog fence installation is simple. Our team will have sent over an estimate with the proposed boundary image. They will have also discussed the different systems with you, Pro Fence 1200, Performance Series and Smart Fence. Once you have agreed on a date and the system they will take some further information about your dog. A deposit is paid to secure the dog fence installation date and a confirmation of the booking will be sent over. Our office team and Dog Fence Installers are here for every step of the journey to answer your questions regarding our electronic dog fences and support you as you transition to giving your pet a happier, safer life.

Dog fence day

As a general rule, we commence the dog fence Installation will commence circa 07.30am! Interestingly this is to avoid rush-hour traffic and maximize daylight during the winter months. Our Installer will walk the boundary with your to fine-tune the electronic dog fence route. Once this has been agreed we should not need your attention again until we commence the dog fence training.

Our unique trenching equipment will bury the cable directly into the ground. We endeavour to bury boundary cables but if the terrain or an area is not suitable we can install cable above ground. Of course, the installation duration will vary depending on the size and the terrain but as a general rule, we will be ready to train your dog in the afternoon.

Electronic dog fence training

Now for the magic! We will not hook your dog up to the mains, we will not hurt your dog, we will train your dog using a recognised protocol. Actually, the training is very subtle and for some dogs, the scariest part is the temporary training flags. These little “flag” aliens can be quite scary to some dogs and others will play or stalk them. As with people, all dogs are different as we will treat them as individuals.  The flags are a vital part of the training and will give the dog a visual for the electronic dog fence boundary.

Don’t worry! Your Installer will look after your pet, he will involve you in the training and you will be amazed at how quick and simple the training is. All our Installers are trained to offer the full Dog Fence Installation & Training program. They will find the level suitable for your pet and work to ensure that he or she understands the fence.

Hopefully, he will answer all your questions but if you forget anything or you have a query you can call the office after the installation. The notes from the day will be electronically uploaded so we can access the training info and answer your questions.

Does the electronic dog fence come with a guarantee?

Absolutely! DogFence offers the most comprehensive guarantee worldwide. Our lifetime hardware warranty covers the transmitter & computer collar for life and even extends to dog chews. But more importantly, we offer a Containment Promise on professionally installed, outdoor systems.

Should your system break down for any reason you can also schedule a service appointment and one of our engineers will test or repair your entire fence or train any new pets that you may have acquired.

Is there any ongoing maintenance for the fence?

Naturally, it is important to check the fence from time to time. At DogFence we recommend testing the electronic fence monthly. This would include checking the battery and collar fit and takes less than 5 minutes. The electronic dog fence collars will alert you when you require a battery. After the dog fence installation, you will be invited to sign up to our battery program. If you decide to purchase batteries on an ad-hoc basis that’s fine.  But it is important to remember that when the battery runs out the pet can run out! Other than the battery and checking the collar fit there is no ongoing maintenance required.

How often do I replace the battery in my dog’s Computer Collar?

Of course, we all lead busy lives but once you see the red flashing light on your electronic dog fence collar you need to take action. The schedule for the battery changes is as follows:

  • R12m & R7m (mini) collars – every 6 months
  • R12 & R9 (standard collars – every 18 – 24 months

The green status light will change from a steady flash every forty seconds to a rapid flash every 10 seconds. At this point, you have approx 2 weeks to change the battery.

Where can I buy Batteries?

DogFence offers a few different options for customers to replace batteries.

  • You can call us
  • You can purchase online
  • Sign up for the battery programme

How often should I remove the electronic collar?

VVIP – the collar needs to be removed every day! Leaving the collar on the dog can cause a skin irritation. We strongly recommend that you remove the collar for a minimum of 6 hours every day but we recommend 8 hours. On the day of the dog fence installation, you will be given all this information again together with a continuation sheet to assist you in the early days’ post installation.

If you would like to know more about our electronic dog fence please call us. We can chat to you and pop together an estimate for the dog fence installation – 03450 623623 or info@dogfence.co.uk.

 

indoor dog fence excludes pets from areas

Indoor dog fence – banish those stair gates forever!

Have you heard about an indoor dog fence?

An Indoor dog fence? Sounds interesting but what is it and how does it work? Actually, it’s not really a fence but a simple electronic aid to create “no go” zones in your home. Using a similar concept to outdoor dog fence our internal units offer flexibility and freedom. Rather than containing your pet to an area, you can exclude pets from certain rooms or places in the home.

Whilst you may be quite happy to share most spaces with your pet there may be some areas that you prefer to exclude him from. Rather than keeping your pet shut in the kitchen or utility room you can give them more freedom internally. For example, you may not want your dog or cat in your baby’s room or even going upstairs. You may want to keep your white sofa free of pet hair or keep exclude your pet from food preparation areas.

All this can be easily achieved by using one of our indoor dog fences. If you are already a dog fence customer then the indoor dog fence is the perfect add on to your outdoor system.

What is an indoor dog fence?

An indoor fence is very similar to the outdoor dog fence. It consists of a radio transmitter, a computer collar but does not necessarily require a boundary wire. At DogFence we offer two types of indoor units:

Portable Indoor dog fence: BOB is our completely portable indoor fence. The BOB is a circular transmitter that is rechargeable and requires no boundary wire. The unit sends out a small zone from the transmitter of up to 8ft in diameter. You can use to exclude pets from sofas or stop them. The size of the zone is adjustable to accommodate different areas for exclusion. The indoor dog fence is fully portable and has 3 settings to give up to 1 month of battery life.

BOB the portable indoor unit

BOB, the portable indoor unit.

Permanent Indoor dog fence: If you have an area that requires permanent exclusion then the IB200 is the perfect tool. This is unit is closely related to our outdoor dog fences as it requires a mains supply to power the unit. The IB200 needs to be plugged into with 8ft of where you require the transmitter or area to be excluded. The transmitter can run in wireless mode. So, just like the BOB, it can create a zone around the transmitter of up to 8ft or you can wire the transmitter to create larger exclusion areas. If you have not put down the floor coverings or have a cellar you use the wire to exclude pets from entire rooms.

How does the indoor unit work?

As with our outdoor dog fences the indoor fence sends out a coded radio signal. The signal is either sent through a boundary wire or from the base station itself. The size of the exclusion zone can be tailored to the area that it is covering. For example under a chair, you may only require a 2ft zone but for a staircase, this will need to be 3 – 5ft. The pet wears a computer collar. If you already have a DogFence outdoor dog fence then this will be the same collar. If you do not already use our system you will need to purchase a computer collar.

The collar is programmed to pick up the radio signal that is being sent out from the indoor dog fence. As with the outdoor dog fence if the pet approaches the “no go zone” the collar jumps into action. Firstly the collar will give out a high pitched warning beep to alert the pet. If the pet continues further the collar then gives out a static impulse (correction). The correction is set to each individual pet’s breed, age, and personality.

To aid the pet you small portable flags are used a visual. Actually, these flags are very similar to the outdoor dog fence training flags but smaller and portable. Once the pet is trained the flags are no longer required. The pet will react to the indoor dog fence is the same way as they do externally, they hear the beep and stop. Internal dog fence training usually only takes a couple of days.

Where can I use an Indoor Fence?

The most popular uses for an indoor dog fence are:indoor dog fence stop Great Dane taking food off the table

  • Stop the pet going upstairs
  • Exclude pets from certain rooms
  • Keep pets off the worktops
  • Keep Fido off the sofa
  • Use in BBQ areas
  • Keep pets away from Christmas Trees!
  • Keep pets away from food storage areas.

Interestingly, the indoor dog fence is also used as part of our cat training protocol. Consequently, cats that are trained using the indoor fence adjust quickly and easily to the outdoor fence. By training internally is a safe and confined area we can be sure that the cat understands the concept of the warning beep and how to retreat.

Our indoor dog fences are a popular add-on to the outdoor fence. We have some owners that have several units. Both the BOB and the IB200 can be added on to your existing outdoor dog fence at any point in time. If you would like to know more about these units please call us on 01628 476475 or email info@dogfence.co.uk. For existing customers, you can order by phone or through our shop here.indoor dog fence flags

 

 

 

Dogs Freedom & Safety – Livestock Attacks

We are sure that your pet’s freedom and safety are of paramount importance to you?

Recently, there is a direct link between the ban on electronic shock collars (e-collars) and attacks on livestock.  In the UK, farmers businesses and their animals are suffering.

Farmers want tougher penalties to be enforced, under the Dangerous Dogs Act.  £3.5 million worth of livestock has been subject to attacks, within the past 3 years.  This is a shocking 113% rise.

New research shows, above all, dog owners are putting their pets on leads when there is nearby livestock.  However, insurers show increasing concerns, of reports, that attacks happen for instance by dogs, who get let out in gardens, escape and attack the sheep, in neighbouring fields.

Let’s take a look at some facts:

 

Freedom Fence Stop Dogs Attacking Livestock

  • 45% of owners admit to leaving their pet at home each day.
  • 28% of dogs left for over 4 hours.
  • 13% of dog owners say their pet has separation anxiety.
  • Research suggests this is much higher at a whopping 85%.
  • Bored or anxious dogs will escape if they can.
  • £1 million in sheep and livestock, savaged by dogs over the past 4 years in Wales.
  • In England this tots up to £3.5 million in the past 3 years.
  • Pet owners fined up to £1000 in court.
  • There is great uproar and calls by farmers for the Dangerous Dogs Act to further increase these penalties.
  • Correlation made between these attacks and the ban of illegal electric shock collars.

Working Towards A Resolution?

  • Dog Fence Ltd has worked closely with authorities for public consultation and our system is approved as Legal, you can read more here that Dog Fences Are Not Banned, for further clarification.
  • Farmers relieved that dog fences (aka. containment fences) are exempt from the proposed e-collar ban.
  • Dog fences have been around for over 40 years.
  • Modern systems achieve criticism, without understanding the mechanics and function of an invisible pet containment fence system.
  • Dog’s & Cats account for 16% of reported animal deaths on major roads in the UK over the past 24 months.
  • It is more important than ever to keep your pets safe at home.
  • The Government has announced that they will implement new regulations into the installation of dog fences.
  • Regulations state how dog fences and cat fences will be correctly installed and owners receive the correct training.
  • DEFRA consulted with DogFence Ltd, as our Company pioneered the full installation and training service to the UK.
  • Since 2003 DogFence Ltd have been offering full installation with training for their pets to the dog fence or cat fence systems.

Get in contact with our team to discuss your needs to prevent yourself from a huge fine, other livestock from potentially getting injured or killed and to keep your pet safely contained with a safe and UK legal dog fence system.