Fencing For Dogs Archives - DogFence

Dogs Freedom & Safety – Livestock Attacks

We are sure that your pets freedom and safety are of paramount importance to you.

Recently been a direct link has been made between the ban on electronic shock collars (e-collars) and attacks on livestock. In the UK  farmers businesses and animals are suffering.

Farmers want tougher penalties to be enforced, under the Dangerous Dogs Act.  £3.5 million worth of livestock has been subjected to attacks within the past 3 years.  This is in other words a shocking 113% rise.

New research shows above all dog owners are putting their pets on leads when there is nearby livestock.  However, insurers show increasing concerns of reports that attacks happen for instance by dogs, let out in gardens, escape and attack the sheep in neighbouring fields.

Lets take a look at some facts:

 

Freedom Fence Stop Dogs Attacking Livestock

  • 45% of owners admit to leaving their pet at home each day.
  • 28% of dogs left for over 4 hours.
  • 13% of dog owners say their pet has separation anxiety.
  • Research suggests this is much higher at a whopping 85%.
  • Bored or anxious dogs will escape if they can.
  • £1 million in sheep and livestock, savaged by dogs over the past 4 years in Wales.
  • In England this tots up to £3.5 million in the past 3 years.
  • Pet owners fined up to £1000 in court.
  • There is great uproar and calls by farmers for the Dangerous Dogs Act to further increase these penalties.
  • Correlation made between these attacks and the ban of illegal electric shock collars.

Working Towards A Resolution?

  • Dog Fence Ltd has worked closely with authorities for public consultation and our system is approved as Legal, you can read more here that Dog Fences Are Not Banned for further clarification.
  • Farmers relieved that dog fences (aka containment fences) are exempt from the proposed e-collar ban.
  • Dog fences have been around for over 40 years.
  • Modern systems achieve criticism without understanding the mechanics and function of an invisible pet containment fence system.
  • With Dog’s & Cats accounting for 16% of reported animal deaths on major roads in the UK over the past 24 months.
  • It is more important than ever to keep your pets safe at home.
  • The Government has announced that they will implement new regulations into the installation of dog fences.
  • Regulations state how dog fences and cat fences will be correctly installed and owners receive correct training.
  • DEFRA consulted with DogFence Ltd as our Company pioneered the full installation and training service to the UK.
  • Since 2003 DogFence Ltd have been offering full installation with training for their pets to the dog fence or cat fence systems.

Get in contact with our team to discuss your needs to prevent yourself from a huge fine, other livestock from potentially getting injured or killed and to keep your pet safely contained with a safe and UK legal dog fence system.

shock caused by electric dog fence

Electric dog fence – the myths and the truth!

What is an electric dog fence?

Electric dog fences have recently made the news. Just like Marmite, they are a contentious issue; people are either strongly for or violently against these systems.

Actually, there is no such thing as an electric dog fence.  The correct name for a dog fence is a radio dog fence. A dog fence does not have any electricity in the cable and is physically incapable of electrocuting a dog or a cat.  Of course, we all know that electric fence is a system used to keep livestock within an area. This type of fencing does have electricity running through the wire or net and is able to deliver an electric shock.

How does a dog fence work?

With a dog fence, the boundary wire carries a harmless radio signal. The dog or cat wears a computer collar which is programmed to pick up the radio signal. The size of the radio field can be altered to the size or breed of the pet. When the pet enters the radio signal zone the collar wakes up and gives out a high pitched warning beep. Should the pet continues further into the zone the collar gives out a static impulse; not an electrical shock. The impulse is similar to a Tens machine or abdominal exercise machine and is completely safe and harmless. The impulse is called a “correction” as it is designed to startle the pet and train them to avoid the area. The label “electric dog fence” is usually given as people assume that an electric shock is delivered when nothing could be further from the truth!

How does an electric fence work?

An Electric Fence is an electrical circuit that is charged by an electric fence energizer.  A high voltage current is sent through the wire, tape or netting.  The charge is sent through the fence in 1-2 second intervals. The fence acts as an open circuit.  This becomes complete when an animal or person standing on the ground touches it.  If an animal touches the wire the circuit closes and the current passes through the animal to deliver an electric shock.

Dog fences are cruel!

Interestingly, recent research has proved that dog fences are far from cruel, in fact, it has been proved that they save lives. Research carried out via the UK Government in conjunction with containment fence Companies and also a privately funded study through Lincoln University has proved that containment fences save lives.

Professor Daniel Mills an eminent Feline Expert “While some will argue that electronic containment systems can never be justified for pets, others highlight that, in the UK alone, hundreds of thousands of cats are killed and injured on roads each year and these devices can prevent these often fatal injuries and the emotional cost to the cats and their owners. In contrast, housing cats solely indoors to remove such risks is associated with increased prevalence of a range of health problems including obesity, Feline Urologic Syndrome and dental disease. Long-term exposure to common flame retardants widely used in homes may also have toxic side effects for cats.”

Sheep Attacks

Rising dog attacks on sheep also highlight the welfare issue that stray dogs can cause to other livestock. Stray dogs can kill sheep, cats and cause RTA’s. Farmers in many areas support the use of “electric dog fences” to keep their own stock safe. In Scotland, the increasing dog attacks on sheep has led to a public consultation regarding changing the law through a Protection of Livestock bill. Whilst the #takethelead campaign is a good starting point. Many dog attacks on livestock are from dogs that have escaped from the property. Similarly, leads can break and collars can be incorrectly fitted so training your dog not to chase sheep is a must.dog fence stops livestock attacks

Far from being cruel dog fences save lives. Much better a small static impulse and some training than the bullet of a gun or being PTS by on a court order.

Can you use an electric fence for pets?

There is no law banning the use of electric fencing for dogs or cats. Whilst the voltage on these systems is very high no testing has been carried out to determine the long effects.  There are certain safety features found within “electric dog fences” that are not found in electric stock fences.

Dog Fence verses Electric Fence

  • Dog Fence – audible warning as pet approaches
  • Electric fence – no warning until pet touches the wire
  • Dog Fence – Automatically shuts down after 15 seconds to prevent distress
  • Electric fence – will continue to shock until the pet is released.
  • Dog Fence – can be used under driveways and open areas
  • Electric fence – can only be used where no access is required
  • Dog Fence – a static correction is humane
  • Electric Fence – high levels of shock may not be good for pets.

Sadly the media and social media groups have given dog fences a bad name. Both research and those that use these fences prove that these systems save pets lives. The label electric dog fence naturally conjures up the idea of a dog being electrocuted or wired up to the electricity. Nothing could be further from the truth. We all accept that sometimes we have to deliver a small amount of discomfort to save a life. We vaccinate our pets and we microchip pet, both of which cause moderate discomfort.  Yet we hear the cries of cruel and barbaric when we discuss dog fences.

Is this because people do not understand how they work or how they feel? These blogs are designed to be open and honest about how the systems work and if you would like to learn more please call us on 03450 623623 or visit our web site https://dogfence.co.uk/. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

invisible dog fence to stop dog going through gate

Invisible dog fence – can pets out run them?

Can dogs run out of an invisible dog fence?

When looking into purchasing an invisible dog fence one of the most commons concerns is will it work? Can the dog run out of the containment fence? Of course, just a like an ordinary fence if the fence is broken or poorly installed it won’t work. So as with any product, an invisible dog fence needs to be correctly installed but more importantly, both the dog and owner need to know how to use it.

If the fence is correctly fitted and both the pet and owner are trained then a “dog out” will rarely happen. In fact, at DogFence we are so confident we even offer a containment promise on our fully installed dog fences.

So what are the reasons that a dog may outrun a dog fence system?

1. Dead Battery

Unlike other brands of containment fences, our Invisible Dog Fences have a long battery life. However, it is still important to check the battery using the tester every 6 months on our mini collars or 18 months on our larger collars. Consistency is the key to the successful use of an invisible dog fence. If the battery runs out the dog can run out. As a rule, we find that 60% of our troubleshooting is down to a dead battery. Using an invisible dog fence is similar to using your car, it requires fuel to operate and needs topping up and checking once in a while.

2. Loose Collar

As with all brands of containment fence, collar fit is crucial. If the collar is dangling around the dog’s neck like a necklace then it will be completely ineffective! Whilst it is true that once trained 90% of dogs will never receive a collar stimulation again the impulse may need to be activated if the dog is in a high drive moment. If the dog enters the zone and carries onto in the avoidance area with no consequence he or she will quickly learn to challenge the fence. A loose collar = a dog on the lose. We always advise checking the collar fit regularly – your pet may lose or gain weight so checking the collar monthly is extremely important. Our handy troubleshooting guide shows how to test the battery and check the collar fit.

3. Invisible Dog Fence Training – lack of Training

As with anything in life you only get out what you put in! When it comes to containment fencing Training is the keyword. If your pet is not correctly trained to use the fence then it will not work for you or your pet.

DogFence is the only UK Company to offer full onsite training within the package. In 2018 the UK Government announced that they would introduce new legislation to ensure that all dog fences are sold with an installation package. At present, the legislation is still pending. It is hoped that through this legislation there will be a standardized certification program. As a small part of our customer base chose to self-install a DIY Dog Fence we offer full support. Naturally, unlike a total mail order Company, our years in the field mean that we can offer expert guidance and support to those who chose to self-install.

When is come to containment training there are 4 critical elements:

  1. Warning flag & audible only familiarisation
  2. Introduction to correction (impulse)
  3. Distraction Training
  4. Reinforcing Training

Warning Beep Training

All invisible dog fences should be sold with flags – at DogFence we use a min of 20 per 100m. The collar should be set to audible only and the pet should be introduced to the training flags. It is with warming beep that will stop the pet in a red mist or high drive moment.

Introduction to correction

The pet must be on a lead through phases 1 – 3 at all times. This is part of the training where the correct impulse level is determined for each pet. It is important to start on the lowest possible level and look for any signs of recognition/reaction to the impulse. This could be as subtle as a flick of the ear of a small flinch. All good containment fence collars should have flexible training levels.

Distraction Training

Once the pet is avoiding the training flags it will be necessary to create some distractions. These can be getting a game going with the pet, having someone else walk through the flags or bringing another dog to the property. Our DogFence Installers will usually involve the customer as part of the distraction and it’s a great way for the owner to really get involved.

Reinforcing Training

Once the pet fully understands the containment fence it is important that he or she associates it with the property and not the installer. The installer will leave full written instructions on how to carry on and when to allow the dog off the lead (cat training is carried out internally).

Freedom!

Once trained the pet has complete freedom and the owner has peace of mind.

 

4. Faulty equipment – Not all Containment Fences are the same!

Dogs will be dogs and the invisible dog fence collar goes through a lot of wear and tear. Many brands of containment fences are Chinese made and the quality is poor. Our invisible dog fences are high-quality but even these can go wrong. Recognizing that consistency is king DogFence offer a Lifetime Warranty on our professionally installed fences. The warranty covers both the transmitter and the computer collars. And because dogs will be dogs we add in a warranty to cover dog chews on the computer collar as well!

As with a car, it is important to check things are working. Our Installers will show you how to carry out the simple monthly checks using the testing tool. Using the correct battery is extremely important. A good quality containment fence collar should alert when a battery is required. At DogFence we recognize that people are busy so we also offer an automatic battery renewal programme.

Similary boundary wire quality is vitally important. If the boundary wire is too thin it will be very prone to damage. DogFence uses a high-quality heavy-duty boundary wire which is 25 times heavier than most DIY brands supply.  When looking for an invisible dog fence look for the following:

  • Long Battery life containment fence giving cockapoo freedom in the garden
  • Lifetime Warranty on Transmitter & Collars
  • Heavy-duty wire
  • Professional Installation & Training
  • Full after sales service

Escaping dogs will always be a problem as they can cause road accidents, kill or harm livestock or wildlife. Using a containment fence is an excellent way of giving the pet freedom but keeping them safe at home. Not all containment fences are the same and not all containment fence suppliers offer the same level of service. If you would like to receive some professional advice and information call us on 03450 623623.

 

 

Freedom Fence for Dogs

The Freedom Of An Invisible Fence

When you got your dog, the chances are you had visualised many things, did you consider fencing and freedom?  Most likely you thought about things such as running with them around the park, taking them out for long walks, cuddling them on the sofa and playing with them in the garden? If you’d wanted a pet that stayed in one place, above all you would have bought a parrot.

Now consider what you dog gets up to when not under your watchful eye or your dog is home alone.  Never presume you dog will sit patiently waiting for your return.

Dogs are curious and energetic and they love to explore.  Caging them is not ideal, it is better to set boundaries and rules early on to allow you to give them freedom from being fenced in to one small area.  Even when you do confine them to one room, you still need to ensure that space is safe.

Dogs Need Freedom

Play For Dogs

Dogs are intelligent animals and can suffer from boredom. If your dog is bored, and does not have enough to do, it will suffer or engage in inappropriate behaviour or simply be determined to escape and go exploring.

Exercise for dogs

A dog needs regular exercise and regular opportunities to walk and to run free under proper supervision outside, but with the freedom our fence gives they can do so unsupervised in an open garden.

What A Dog Needs To Behave Normally

You should:

  • make sure your dog has enough to do so that it does not become distressed or bored
  • ensure your dog has access to safe toys and suitable objects to play with and chew
  • provide a shaded place so your dog can rest undisturbed when it wants to
  • provide your dog with regular opportunities for exercise and play with people or other friendly dogs
  • give your dog the exercise it needs, at least daily, to keep your dog fit, active and stimulated
  • seek veterinary advice if you become aware of changes in behaviour, as your dog may be distressed, bored, ill or injured
  • train your dog to behave well, ideally from a very young age
  • only use positive reward based training – avoiding harsh, potentially painful or frightening training methods
  • think about garden boundaries and keeping your pet safe and unable to escape.
  • consider our certified legal wireless dog freedom fence system for both inside and outside your home/grounds.

Containment Free of A Fence

You don’t need physical fences and borders to keep your dog contained anymore. Our Dog Fence products work both indoor and outdoor.  We can show you how effective a wireless pet containment system is when it comes to keeping your dog in one area and making sure they are safe at home.

You can use an invisible fence system to block off certain parts of your home and to create safe spaces of freedom. You can do the same in the garden, which is exceptionally useful if you’ve got a large garden and want to create a safe play area, perhaps away from your garden furniture or plants fence freedom at its finest.

Pet Containment System

How Can I Keep My Dog In The Garden?

Pet Containment System

Dogs love spending time outdoors, but you may not be able to realistically walk your dog for hours every day. If you live in a home with a fenced-in garden, you can let your dog spend some outside time every day on your property.

In order to keep your dog confined to the garden boundary, you’ll need to ensure that your pet containment system is in place and your dog won’t escape and that you prioritise your dog’s needs being met.

It’s important that you spend time with your dog, so never leave your dog outside for prolonged periods of time without proper supervision and attention.

By giving your dog a safe, fun environment to play in, your dog can have plenty of exercise and outdoor time right outside your door.

Keeping Your Dog Safe Outside

Check the weather.

Extreme heat or extreme cold can potentially kill dogs left outdoors. Some dog breeds, like pugs, are particularly sensitive to extremes in temperature. You should never leave a dog unattended outdoors for prolonged periods of time, especially if the weather is going to be very hot or very cold.

Humidity and wind chill can also endanger a pet. All dogs are sensitive to humidity because they pant to cool themselves, and if the air is very humid their bodies will overheat very quickly.

Check the weather and the humidity/wind chill levels before leaving your dog outside. Add the air temperature (in Fahrenheit) plus the humidity level, and if that number is higher than 150 your dog is at risk of heat stroke.

If the temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 degrees Celsius), you should keep your dog indoors.

Wind chill can quickly kill dogs left outdoors, regardless of what the air temperature is. Bring your dog indoors if the air temperature or the wind chill drops below freezing in your area.

Short-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in cold weather, while long-haired dog breeds are generally more uncomfortable in hot weather.

As a general rule, if you’re too warm or cold while exposed to the elements outdoors, your dog will be too.

Pet Containment System

 

 

 

Give your dog water.

Dogs need constant access to fresh, clean drinking water. In hot weather, dogs will need to drink even more water. You can help keep your dog cooler in hot weather by adding ice to the water bowl.

Provide some shade and shelter.

Dogs need relief from the elements, and if you don’t let your dog indoors that relief will have to be provided outside. Your dog will also need a place to retreat to if it starts to rain or snow, or if your pet simply wants to feel safe and protected.

Dog houses don’t protect dogs on hot days. If anything, the confining space actually makes your dog even hotter. Shade from overhead trees is ideal.

If you don’t have trees in your garden, you can hang tarps across part to give your dog a breezy, shaded spot. Your dog should also have a covered area to retreat to if it rains.

A small dog house or some other type of shelter would be ideal for this situation. Make sure your dog’s shelter blocks out the wind if you plan on leaving your dog outdoors during the winter. Your dog should have a raised bed so it is not lying on the ground, whether it’s hot out or cold.

You may want to consider an insulated doghouse as well to protect against heat and cold.

Exercise your dog.

Dogs need exercise every day in order to stay physically and mentally fit. If your dog is not getting enough exercise, leaving it outdoors in the garden will lead to bored, restless behaviour.

That behaviour is often destructive and undesirable. You may assume that being outside is its own form of exercise, but to your dog, it may feel like abandonment.

Never leave your dog in the garden without first giving it some type of exercise. Make sure your dog gets at least two long walks each day that leave your pet tired and panting. This will help ensure that your dog isn’t bored or restless.

Leave toys outside.

In addition to exercise, dogs need time to play. It’s good for their minds and bodies, as the physical exhaustion of play is usually mixed with solving puzzles, hunting, or chasing.

Try leaving chew toys in the yard, as well as toys that can be filled with food. Kong toys, for example, will keep your dog occupied and make your pet feel like it’s working to earn its food.

Limit outdoor time.

Leaving a dog unattended is, generally, considered safe if it’s for brief periods of time.  However, every dog is different and some dogs may have intense anxiety about being left alone. Anxiety can lead to undesirable behavioural issues like digging, chewing, fighting the fence, and incessant barking whilst outside.

Remember that dogs are pack animals. They need companionship, and if you leave them alone outside all the time they may experience psychological trauma.

If your dog is alone for prolonged periods of time, it will get bored and create destructive “jobs” to relieve that boredom.  To ensure your dog is safe and is not engaging in any behavioural problems, keep unsupervised outdoor time to a minimum.

Confining Your Dog to the Garden

Build a tall fence.

The safest way to keep a dog on your property is by having a fenced-in yard. A fenced-in garden, carries a risk, that your dog has the potential to jump over the fence or dig underneath it to escape.

Make sure your fence is tall enough that your dog won’t be able to jump over it. Ask your vet or a qualified dog trainer how high your dog (based on breed, body size, etc.) can realistically jump.

Check your fence for weaknesses. A strong dog could easily break through a weak fence or squeeze through a small gap.
If you don’t want to fence in your whole yard, consider building a dog run. You can buy and connect chain link fence sections, then put a roof over the run so your dog will have shade and won’t be able to jump out.

Avoid tying or chaining your dog.

Though a tethered line may seem ideal for outdoor time, especially for dogs that dig or jump, it’s actually quite dangerous.  A dog can easily sustain an injury by getting tangled up in a rope, leash or chain.  This is why it’s so important to supervise your dog at all times.

Accidental strangulation is a significant risk for dogs who are left tied up, alone, for prolonged periods of time.  Dogs left tied up or chained outside frequently has built-up energy and aggression. These dogs may take out that aggression on people, including family members.

Some countries actually have laws against tethering dogs. Keeping your dog tied or chained, may result in fines and end with your dog being taken from your home.

Consider A Wireless Dog Fence.

People falsely assume that a dog can be safely left outdoors when there is an electronic fence in place. However, electronic fences are actually quite unsafe for dogs and here in the UK many are illegal.

Dogs often run through the fence barrier to chase animals or flee from fireworks and are reluctant to cross back into the garden, leaving them wandering the streets aimlessly.

Make sure you get a wireless pet fence which is legal for use in your country such as the DogWatch system by DogFence who have worked with the government to ensure their product fully conforms to legislation.

If you would like a free in-home consultation for the installation of a wireless pet containment system, please contact Dog Fence today!

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

Is A Dog Fence For Me? Pet Containment Solutions.

In need of a dog fence for a currently escaping dog?

Are you asking yourself how hard it can be to contain your best friend? Many breeds of large dogs want to get in touch with their wild side and chase the neighbourhood squirrels or bark at cars. If you have a big, strong, energetic dog, you should think carefully about the type of fencing for dogs needed before adding it to your garden.

Dog Fence for escaping dogs

The trick is to find a fence that satisfies your budget and aesthetic desires while stopping your furry friend from going on the adventure of his doggy dreams.

Here are four factors to keep in mind when choosing the perfect fence:

 

1. Big dogs need big fences …because they can jump!

A four-foot high fence is unlikely to deter a Husky, Golden Retriever, or Labrador, so you should look for a fence with a height of five or even six feet. For most breeds, six feet should be sufficient. Dog owners start adding extensions to make their fences higher and higher, enables your dog to learn how to jump a little higher each time! Your best bet, in this case, is to tear down your old fence and install a wireless pet fence.

2. Make that fence impossible to climb!

No matter how high your fence is, a clever dog will still try to get over it somehow. Even if he can’t jump it, he may be able to climb it. When choosing a fence, it’s crucial to make sure the design of the fence itself is totally climb-proof. Chain link fences are a bad idea for climbers—they provide your dog with easy footholds! A solid panel fence, on the other hand, has a flat surface without anywhere for your dog to stick his paws, yet your ingenious pooch can leverage items close by to get a foot us such as planters placed alongside a fence. Even better is a wireless dog fence that eliminates any climbing.

3. Give a little privacy!

Okay, your dog may not care about privacy at all, but a wooden privacy fence is a great option for peace of mind. Aside from their climb-proof nature, solid panel privacy fences are great because your dog can’t see what’s on the other side. If he can’t actually see other dogs and people and everything else he loves to bark at, he’ll be a lot calmer. He won’t be visible to other dogs on their walks either, who may get distracted and start barking. Ultimately, choosing the best fence for your dog depends on how your dog behaves and reacts to the outside world. So take some time to consider what will best suit your four-legged companion before making a decision.

4. Make your pet not WANT to escape!

Dogs don’t usually like being restricted, whether it’s a physical or invisible barrier. Boredom is a major factor that tempts dogs to try to escape your garden. If your dog requires a lot of exercise but isn’t being walked regularly, putting up an adequate fence will not be an easy fix to your problem. Maybe you’ll be able to prevent your dog from escaping, but your dog won’t be very happy—and an unhappy dog makes an unhappy owner. Dogs simply don’t thrive when they are cooped up in a little yard. A fence is necessary to keep your dog in, but as a behavioural fix, it’s only a starting point. Creating a dog-friendly garden is one way to keep your dog entertained between the fence walls.

Conclusion

Not everyone has a spacious garden or the ability to provide a dog with ample exercise. That’s exactly why bigger dogs aren’t for everyone, but the right fence does go a long way in terms of keeping your dog safe and secure. Managing massive dogs can be a massive challenge, but for owners that are able to take that challenge, it’s worth the effort so you can keep your dog around for massive cuddles.

Need a wireless fence for your pet? Get in touch & request your quote today!

invisible fence | Dog Fence

Invisible Fence – Points To Consider and Benefits

Invisible Fence – Points To Consider?

An invisible fence for pet owners, who have recently added a large breed dog to their family, with no idea what they are getting themselves into.

Breeders will say your breed of dog is prone to be calm and would usually laze around under a tree.  Your precious dog loves to lounge around under trees.  You dog also, often prefers the ones at the park, a few miles down the road.

Suddenly your days are now about chasing and tracking a dog that is proud of its ability to run away.  Escaping regardless of a five foot chain-link fence.  Your dog can climb, crawl and dig its way out in a matter of minutes.

There is a great solution on the market, an invisible dog fence containment system.

Contain and train your pet with the invisible dog fence.invisible fence | Dog Fence

Electric dog fences and e-collars are a training tool.  As such they are only good when backed up by a constant training program.

The goal is for your dog in its lifetime,  gets exposed to correction a few times.  With training they acknowledge that crossing the boundary results in correction.  This will suffice to keep them in their assigned area.  Electric dog fences are for engaged dogs with high intelligence.

Electronic dog fences are very effective at keeping your dog where it belongs and to have freedom but, it does not create a barrier to keep other dogs away from your property.

Many vendors online offer a low-cost, low quality pet fence.  Equipped with weak, unreliable collars with minimal features.  A bad quality electric dog fence is just like not having any fence at all.  Go for a brand that is well known like Dogwatch & DogFence.

Understanding your terrain and any potential interference such as metal buildings and hills is essential for the success of your containment system. It is always a good idea to speak to an electric dog fence professional to help plan your layout and boundaries and install your fence.

Benefits of an electric dog fence.

1.  Any size of dog will be contained by the invisible fence solution.

2. Dogs learn many tricks that their owners teach them, but they also learn skills on their own. Many dog owners have witnessed their pet open doors in their homes, and this does not limit their abilities to escape from a fixed fence garden.

3. You may already have a fenced area that your pet is familiar with and may know how to escape from. It is particularly challenging to find the right fence for dogs that dig or open fences. These habits may be difficult to stop, but choosing an electronic dog fence and with training stops the ability or escape attempts.

4. Dogs with destructive tendencies may damage fixed fencing, the electronic dog fence is hidden thus resolving this issue.

5. You no longer have to consider the fencing material needed or determine the height needed to contain your pet, the last thing to consider is how much of your property you want accessible to your dog. Many homeowners choose to exclusively fence in the back garden, but with a hidden dog fence you can customise select areas of your property for your pet to enjoy and save some as a pet free zone.

Once you consider the benefits of electronic fences for dogs, you can have peace of mind it will prevent your pooch from getting lost or injured. Why not get in touch with our friendly team of experts today to discuss your requirements.

Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

How To Keep Your Dog’s Freedom Safe This Spring

Freedom as Spring is just about to arrive, with this comes the pleasure of getting out and letting your pet roam and explore inside the garden fence boundaries once more.Dogs having freedom from a garden fence in the spring

Spring Pet Freedom Safety Tips.

  1. Use heartworm and flea and tick preventive Now!  Your dog or cat should be receiving year-round monthly heart-worm preventive.
  2. Be lungworm aware. Lungworm can be contracted either by dogs eating slugs and snails, or from drinking water from a bowl where a slug or snail has been.  Even picking up a toy that a slug or snail has crawled into poses a risk.  So don’t leave toys in the garden overnight and regularly clean out any water bowls in the garden.
  3. Spring clean carefully – As you clean out your garages and prep your gardens, treat your fence etc.  Remember these activities may pose a risk to your pet. Fertilisers, pesticides, weed-killers, and even mulch can all be dangerous to dogs and cats.  Take care when you are putting things like this inside your garden boundaries,  where they are accessible for your pet to investigate or worse consume.
  4. When gardening, DO NOT use slug pellets to protect your plants, as these are tasty but toxic to dogs and can have fatal results.
  5. Just because the suns out doesn’t mean you should instantly take your pet out on long walks.  Your dog will be just as out of shape from winter inactivity as you are.  This is the time of year veterinarians see torn ligaments, strains and sprains, and a variety of aches and pains in dogs. Take it easy. Gradually build up strength and stamina, this is especially true in older pets.
  6. Longer days also mean pets go into “heat.”  For many stray, homeless, and neglected dogs and cats, this means unwanted litters. Animal shelters and rescue groups are typically stretched to capacity during spring.  Do what you can.  If you know someone looking for a pet, encourage adoption or rescue.
  7. It is a legal requirement for all dogs in the UK to be micro-chipped, so make sure your dog is chipped and your contact details on the microchip database are kept up to date.  Also your dog should wear a collar and tag, bearing the owner’s details whenever he is out in public.  If your dog makes a bid for freedom, beyond your garden fence, it can mean paying a sum to your local dog warden to get your pet back.
  8. The sun can be quite intense even in the Spring so do not leave dogs in cars on hot days.
  9. Plants are popping up in the spring and there are some flowers and plants which pose a danger to your pets.  Lilies are especially toxic to cats, if ingested every part of the lily came cause serious health problems and even be fatal.  For dogs – lilies, azaleas and foxglove flowers and even daffodil bulbs can present a danger to your dog.
  10. Always keep your dog on the lead in fields where there is livestock. Chances are they will have young this time of year, especially lambs. Also be aware that birds like pheasants and swans nest on the ground so don’t let your dog disturb the nests.
  11. Keep an eye on your dog in the garden as dog thefts from gardens are on the increase.  NEVER tie your dog up outside a shop – every day we see stories of dogs being stolen in this way.

What else happens in spring?Freedom beyond the fence in spring for dog walking

That’s right Easter – a time for chocolate and sweets.  Children and adults can accidentally drop these around the house, in the garden and out in public. A dogs trusty nose can sniff out a sweet treat with ease.

But here it is, its not a treat, it’s a danger – Why?

Chocolate – Chocolate, even in the smallest amounts, can cause serious health problems if ingested by a dog. The darker the chocolate, the greater the danger to the dog. Beyond the initial symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea, chocolate toxicity can lead to tremors, increased heart rate, heart failure, seizures, and in some cases, can be fatal.

Xylitol – Sugar-free candies and gum can contain large amounts of the artificial sweetener Xylitol.  Xylitol is highly toxic to some dogs and has been found to cause low blood sugar and liver failure.

Freedom For Your Dog?  Have You Checked Your Fence?

Your dog may spend longer in the garden now, so check your fencing and gates are secure both to prevent your dog escaping and to prevent your dog being stolen.

Perhaps you would prefer a specialist invisible pet fence so you have peace of mind that your beloved pet won’t escape.  They get out through open gates, dig their way out under a fence or even climb or jump over it, thereby having the freedom to roam.  Worse still your dog could end up in a road accident.

With a little foresight and planning, spring can be the best time of year for your pet. Go out in the fresh air and enjoy the freedom of spring!