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dog fencing options

Affordable dog fencing – what are the options?

Affordable dog fencing

When it comes to affordable dog fencing there aren’t many options as fencing is actually quite expensive.  As with everything you get what you pay for and it depends on whether you want to get your hands dirty. Naturally, these fencing options are based on how large an area you need to fence. The landscape that you need to fence. And also the breed of the dog that requires the dog fencing!

Dog fencing for small areas

If you are looking to fence a small back garden then it is likely that you already have a fence or wall but it isn’t meeting your needs. Watch your dog and see if he is using something to climb up and scrabble over or is he climbing or digging. Consider installing trellis above your fence. This can be bought from any good DIY store and is relatively quick to install. If you have a digger add a concrete footer below your fence by pouring concrete along the edge of the fence and sinking the bottom of the fence into the concrete before it dries.  This is naturally a labour intensive job but should do the trick!

dog fencing using trellis on wall

Trellis placed on top of wall

If you are not sure where he is getting out then one of our DIY dog fences is going to be the cheapest way forward. These fences are under £250.00 and will cover a small urban garden. If you compare the price of re-fencing a complete rear garden versus adding an electronic dog fence the dog fence will win on price all day long!

For small gardens with low fences, you may be able to upgrade your fence to a close board fence. These fences start at around £38.00 per metre fully installed. You will need to check that you can install a fence of this height before ripping out the old fence.

Rural gardens and small paddocks

It goes without saying that dog fencing for rural areas can be a headache. Not only are you trying to stop your dog going out but the local wildlife is busy pushing its way in. If you have an issue with rabbits and small dogs then this could be a good option for you but it is not the cheapest! Rabbit fencing starts at approx £130.00 per 50m without installation! If you are covering a 1-acre site this will cost in the region of £690.00 just for the galvanised mesh without any posts of labour. Also unless it is extremely well-installed rabbit fencing can be damaged by larger mammals such as Badgers, Muntjack and larger Deer.

dog fencing for rabbits

Rabbit fence used as dog fencing

If you have hedges or areas with no existing fences then the cheapest form of fencing will be either a stock fence or an electronic dog fence. If you have horses or livestock then you will need to look at stock fencing options. Of course, if it is only a dog or a cat that needs containing then an electronic dog fence is by far the cheapest option.

Our DIY dog fence can be expanded up to an acre for an additional £100.00 and a Professionally Installed dog fence will cost in the region of £1000.00 depending on the location and number of dogs. This would work out more cost-effective than the galvanized or stock fencing and would also protect the driveways. Installing gates can also be very costly and of course, this relies on people shutting the gate when they come or go! Our Professionally installed fences have a lifetime warranty on the hardware and a containment promise for the dog.

Large estates and difficult terrains

If it aesthetics then Estate fencing is most certainly the winner but you will need deep pockets to install this timeless classic! At around £80.00 per 2m panel + installation, it will very soon add up, especially on the large country estate! Again, you will need to think about gates and this type of fencing is not dog secure. Other popular types of fencing are post and rail with stock fencing below or chain link fencing. Chain link fencing is probably the cheapest starting from around £2500 for 1 acre + installation. Whereas if you are looking at fencing 10 acres using our Performance Series on a 10-acre site the cost would be circa £1800.00 including installation & training.

dog fencing used as estate fencing

Estate fencing

Riverbanks and Undulating Terrain

If your property goes down to the river you may be able to install a small picket fence. These will not stop all dogs as they tend to only be a 90 cm – 100cm high. Prices for Picket fencing start at around £12.00 per metre plus installation.  Alternatively, you can use our dog fence to run along the boundary. This will keep your dog out of the river without disrupting the view. If you have very undulating terrain then you will probably need to install a stock fence but there would be a hefty surge-charge to install this! Again, an invisible fence can be installed for a fraction of the cost.  The trencher used to install the invisible dog fence is extremely adaptable and be operated in both steep and undulating terrain. Images of the dog fence trencher can be seen on our installation & training page.

dog fencing by river using picket fence

Picket fence along river bank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog Fencing price summary

Based on an acre (and excluding gates)

    • Electronic dog fence (1 dog fully installed – covers gateways as well) – from £3.50 per metre installed.
    • Stock Fencing (no gates) – from £7.00 per metre installed
    • Rabbit Fencing (no gates) – from £8.00 per metre installed
    • Stock Fencing with post and rail (no gates) – from £12.00 per metre
    • Picket fencing (no gate) – from £20.00 per metre
    • Close board fence (no gate) – from £35.00 per metre installed
    • Estate fencing (no gate) from £40.00 per metre installed

Prices have been based on submissions from Companies in Berkshire (2019). Prices are based on properties in the local area and are a guide.

If you have been searching for dog fencing options then read our testimonials on our Trust Pilot reviews. If you would like more information or prices call us today on 03450 623623 or complete our quote form.

 

 

 

sheep grazing keep dogs on lead to stop dog sheep chasing sign

Escaping dogs in the country are a danger to sheep

Solutions to stop a dog chasing sheep

It’s getting to that time of year when the wildlife is waking up. In early Spring our most common call is I am concerned about my dog getting out and chasing sheep or livestock. Usually owners have tried everything, plugged the hedge, lifted the fence height and all to no avail. If a dog has a high interest in Sheep and has had no training sooner or later he or she will be in with the sheep. For some dogs it’s just the chase, for others it’s the kill. Also a dog with a high prey drive will probably have a high interest in cats or other livestock.

What are the penalties for a dog chasing sheep?

  • Ultimately his life – the farmer has the right to shoot if he considers that the dog is a threat to his flock and there are no reasonable means of preventing it.dog chasing sheep

So What steps can an owner take to prevent their dog chasing sheep?

  • Training – find a good trainer that has a proven track record in this field of expertise (see list below). As Company we recommend a Balanced Trainer. A Balanced Trainer will use multiple tools to train the dog, including an e-collar if necessary.
  • Ensure that the garden fencing is dog proof. If you are rural, even if you don’t have livestock nearby make sure your fence is secure. The wildlife may tempt him out but ultimately he may end up in trouble with a farmer or a vehicle.
  • Walking the dog on a lead where sheep are present. It’s good practice, no matter how good your dog is if there are sheep around pop him on a lead for a few minutes.

Training for sheep chasing

  • Balanced dog trainers will use a range of tools and methods to modify the dog’s behaviour and desire sheep. They will work with you and your dog in a controlled situation and will modify the dog’s desire and interest to chase sheep.
  • Many old school farmers will advocate putting the dog in a pen with an older Ewe. This can be a risky move as a large Ewe can cause considerable damage to a dog when cornered. It is most certainly a harsh method but may ultimately save the dogs life.
  • Some Trainers recommend reward only training. Many dogs will recall well in normal situations using this training method. The issue is if you have a dog with a high drive usually the treat is insufficient to divert the attention and so this method not always successful for sheep chasing.

How can I make my rural property dog proof?

  • Deer or stock fencing may be a solution but can be costly and unsightly. It is also not always effective as dogs will climb up and over or dig under the fence.
  • Electronic dog fences are a great solution as they will back up your current fencing.

Are Electronic Fences banned?

No, electronic fences are not banned and have not been included in the recent e-collar ban proposals. Electronic fences are a great way to give your dog freedom but also keep them safe in the garden. Unlike traditional fences if the dog is trained correctly then the fence will keep even the keenest dog at home. Interestingly, a dog fence can also often be installed on terrain that is not suitable for traditional fencing. A dog fence, often referred to as an electric dog fence, will also cover driveways and vulnerable open areas.

The word “electric” is actually incorrect as there is no electricity in the cable or the collar. As with an e-collar, it is a static impulse that is generated, very similar to a Tens machine. When a dog is trained to an “electric dog fence” he is conditioned to respond a warning beep. The training is gentle and effective, with many owners asking “when will he get the shock?” only to be told that the dog has already received the stimulation.

DogFence Ltd have been installing the hidden dog fences for over 16 years. We have fenced and contained many dogs on their last chance saloon. We offer a containment promise with our Professional Dog Fences but as with all dog ownership this does involve management from the owner.

  1. Put the collar on the dog every day – it’s useless in the draw!
  2. Make sure the collar is correctly fitted – a lose collar can equal a lose dog!
  3. Remember to change the battery at the correct interval – DogFence batteries last 6 months or 2 years depending on the collar and we even offer automatic renewal programmes so you don’t forget.

Conclusion

The majority of dog owners recognise that dogs need to be trained so that they can enjoy walking together. Sadly owners cannot be present 24/7 and it maybe that the dog escapes from the garden and ends up in a field full of sheep. Installing an electronic dog fence gives owners peace of mind whilst allowing the dog the freedom to enjoy the open air.

If you would like to know more about how DogFence can secure your garden give us a buzz. Our lovely office team can measure out your boundary and give options for the fence remotely. Call us today on 01628 476475 or click here for a quote.

Below is a list of Balanced Dog Trainers that we recommend for sheep chasing:

Take The Lead Training – Devon  – Jamie Penrith.

Dutiful Dogs – London & South East England – Nicky Bulter

Southend Dog Training – Essex – Adam Spivey

Paws in Nature – Cheshire – Andrew Lang

 

 

a dog is for life - retriever puppy in santa hat

A dog is for life!

A dog is for life – t’was the month before Xmas

T’was a month before Christmas and all around the house the children were squealing we want a pet mouse;
Or a hamster, a kitten, a dog or a horse. We PROMISE to look after it forever, of course!

So straight onto Google the parents they went; looking for puppies from Carmarthen to Kent.
A Springer, a Boxer, a Cocker or Lab. A puppy t’was decided would be incredibly Fab.

On the week before Christmas, the puppy came home.
To shouts of excitement and can I give him a bone? a dog is for life - retriever puppy sleeping

All soft and adorable with huge puppy eyes.
But all through the night for his mother he cries.

The children were sad; does he not love us dear Mum
We thought he’d be bouncy and all full of fun!

He poohed on the floor and chewed up their toys.
He barked and whimpered and made a strange noise.

He peed on carpet and jumped on the beds
and by morning the family had their hands in their heads!

Who knew having a puppy could cause so much stress,
We just weren’t prepared for all of this mess!

But puppies like children seem rather demanding
and puppies need training and words of commanding.

Oh what shall we do? shall we keep him or not?
Just send him away and be forever forgot?

Shall we contact a trainer, who knows what they’re doing,
Perhaps they can help with the peeing and poohing.

Should we have taken better advice,
looked at the kitten or the little white mice?

But all pets have needs whatever they be;
Whether they’re fluffy or furry or really scaly!

The family decided to stick with this boy
and after seeking some help, they were rewarded with joy!

A happy, loyal friend who’s been loved and adored,
A playmate forever so the kids were not bored.

Now he is old, smelly and grey
And the family have loved him for many a daya dog is for life - old retriever

He’s been there through trauma, sadness and sorrow
and given his love for today and tomorrow.

And when he is gone the family will hurt
As the memories of Archie cannot be usurped.

So remember this Christmas a dog is for life,
he’ll poo on your floor but he will change your life.

Sam Chapman – DogFence Ltd

 

stop dogs escaping from garden

Top Tips to Stop your Dog from Escaping Out of The Garden

Top Tips to Stop your Dog from Escaping Out of The Garden

stop dogs escaping from garden

Yipee – let’s go guys!

Boredom, loneliness, territory protection, prey instincts and separation anxiety are reasons that may lead a dog to stray. So how do you stop your dog from escaping? The answer may be more straight forward than you think.  Firstly it is important to assess the reasons why the dog is escaping.  What is it that draws him off, is it food, livestock another dog or boredom? It goes without saying that every dog owner wishes to prevent their dog from escaping and getting into danger. Outside the safety of the garden your dog risks getting into a fight, being hit by a vehicle, being stolen or even eating something poisonous. There is also responsibility; a free roaming dog is a threat to children, livestock and even other dogs on a lead.

Train your dog?

You may have already asked your trainer how to stop your dog from escaping. Many owners report that the dog develops the habit of escaping through the front door as soon as it is opened. They may also get rewarded for escaping. They get to roam the neighbourhood, scour bins and possibly enjoy a game with another dog! Hence, this then becomes a hard to break habit. Teach your dog to wait at the door until you open it for him and to never go out on its own. Always rewards his good behavior. Your dog will stop getting out of the garden to enjoy treats from you.

Secure your garden

Ensure that your garden area is well secured to stop your dog from escaping. You may be able to use a 6-foot fence to secure the area because most dogs cannot jump over it – you could also consider digging in a chicken wire along the fence line below ground. When a dog is determined to escape, it can do anything to gain access to digging under the 6-foot fence. The chicken wire will be uncomfortable for the dog, and may prevent deter the dog from digging. You can also place concrete or wood blocks at the bottom of your fence to discourage digging. Try to avoid picket fencing as this can cause serious injury to your dog or cat if they impale themselves on the stakes. The issue with a lot of fencing is that wildlife can damage the wire and make holes within the fencing.

Containment fencing

If you have an uneven garden terrain, consider having a smaller dog run that could be confined to one corner. Another alternative for securing the garden is installing underground or invisible fencing. The hidden fence uses a small computer collar that interacts with a signal that surrounds the property. When the dog enters the “no go zone” the dog’s collar reacts to the radio signal and gives the dog a high pitched warning beep to alert the dog that he or she is in the wrong area. If the dog continues the collar gives out a low level static shock (correction). The dog will have been trained to know where the “no go zone” area is located through a training protocol that uses both vocal and visual indicators. The advantage of an invisible dog fence is that they can be installed on nearly any terrain.

Over the years there has been negative press on the use of electronic dog fences, often referred to as electric dog fence but recent studies have dispelled the myths, indeed a study into cat containment reported that there are no negative long term effects with using an electronic fence. (Lincoln 2016) http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/news/2016/09/1265.asp.

The issue of how to stop your dog from escaping is always going to be a difficult subject but below are few tips:-

Driveways and open boundaries

Driveways are always going to be a weak point, as are open areas which cannot be fenced due to planning restrictions. These areas really are ideal for using electric dog fences. Escaping dogs will always use the weakest point on a property and an open gateway or clear area is a golden opportunity for a dog to make a bid for freedom. An underground dog fence will operate invisibly and effectively 24/7 to prevent the dog or cat from escaping through the vulnerable area. Owners often install electric gates to keep dogs and cats off the roads, however, most dogs will quickly learn that when they hear the buzzer they have an open opportunity to not just run out but amble out at a steady pace. An underground dog fence can be fitted in conjunction with electric gates to prevent the pet from escaping when they hear the buzzer.

stop dogs from escaping through driveway

An open driveway is difficult to secure.

Consequences of an escaping dog

If your dog escapes and is caught by a council dog warden you may be issued with a warning, a caution or a fixed penalty fine. If your dog is considered out of control you may even be prosecuted and fined. The penalty is up to 6 months in prison or an unlimited fine!  This is surely a big enough incentive to stop a a dog from escaping! Also further controls can be given to the owner.  In some cases the dog may be transferred to a local kennels whilst the owner is located at a heavy daily cost or even transferred to shelter and possibly re-homed. Recent media reports have also found out that the RSPCA is too quick to euthanise. Sadly owners pets have been permanently separated from their vets within a matter of weeks.

 

Exercise your dog

A dog that only stays and plays in the garden will eventually get bored, stressed, frustrated and unhappy. Dog’s need a change of scenery. Just like people a change is as good as a rest. If your dog is bored it will look for ways to break the tedium.  For you and your dog’s sanity it is advisable to walk your dog every day if possible. This way he can experience a new environment, remain engaged and interact with other dogs. Exercises not only boosts your dog’s socialization skills but also stimulates its mind. Country walks or walks in the park are a great way to stimulate your dog. The sounds, scents and interaction with nature and other dogs will keep him fresh. If you exercise your dog daily or regularly then this should help to stop your dog escaping from the garden.

Conclusion

Just like human beings, dogs like adventure and to discover new things. If you want to stop your dog from escaping you need to break the cycle. It may be that you need to install a containment fence or that you need to train your dog or exercise him more. If the issue is not tackled then the habit will continue. As an owners we must look at the issue from two angles. Primarily we need to be responsible for our dog’s welfare, state of mind and health. However, we also have a responsibility to those people, livestock and property that a wandering dog may come in contact with.  An engaged happy dog will be less likely to wander.