Christmas Dog

a dog is for life - retriever puppy in santa hat

A dog is for life!

A dog is for life – t’was the month before Xmas

T’was a month before Christmas and all around the house the children were squealing we want a pet mouse;
Or a hamster, a kitten, a dog or a horse. We PROMISE to look after it forever, of course!

So straight onto Google the parents they went; looking for puppies from Carmarthen to Kent.
A Springer, a Boxer, a Cocker or Lab. A puppy t’was decided would be incredibly Fab.

On the week before Christmas, the puppy came home.
To shouts of excitement and can I give him a bone? a dog is for life - retriever puppy sleeping

All soft and adorable with huge puppy eyes.
But all through the night for his mother he cries.

The children were sad; does he not love us dear Mum
We thought he’d be bouncy and all full of fun!

He poohed on the floor and chewed up their toys.
He barked and whimpered and made a strange noise.

He peed on carpet and jumped on the beds
and by morning the family had their hands in their heads!

Who knew having a puppy could cause so much stress,
We just weren’t prepared for all of this mess!

But puppies like children seem rather demanding
and puppies need training and words of commanding.

Oh what shall we do? shall we keep him or not?
Just send him away and be forever forgot?

Shall we contact a trainer, who knows what they’re doing,
Perhaps they can help with the peeing and poohing.

Should we have taken better advice,
looked at the kitten or the little white mice?

But all pets have needs whatever they be;
Whether they’re fluffy or furry or really scaly!

The family decided to stick with this boy
and after seeking some help, they were rewarded with joy!

A happy, loyal friend who’s been loved and adored,
A playmate forever so the kids were not bored.

Now he is old, smelly and grey
And the family have loved him for many a daya dog is for life - old retriever

He’s been there through trauma, sadness and sorrow
and given his love for today and tomorrow.

And when he is gone the family will hurt
As the memories of Archie cannot be usurped.

So remember this Christmas a dog is for life,
he’ll poo on your floor but he will change your life.

Sam Chapman – DogFence Ltd

 

Puppy Unaware of Canine Christmas Dangers

Canine Christmas Dangers

Christmas time is just around the corner and should be enjoyed by every member of the family. Dogs technically don’t know what Christmas is but they do know that everyone is excited and there are many new shiny objects that they have never seen before, some of which could cause them harm. Here’s our guide to some of the main Christmas dangers to your dog so you can keep them safe this year.

Christmas Food

We all do it, sneaking the dog some turkey under the table. It’s a special time of the year and everyone deserves a treat. Unfortunately there is a long list of Christmas foods that are actually poisonous to dogs.  These include: chocolate, onions, nuts, blue cheese, and all forms of grapes (including the raisins and sultanas found in Christmas pudding).

It is also well documented that dogs love to chew on bones. What is not so well documented is that bones become brittle and are more likely to splinter after they have been cooked. This can lead to small fragments being swallowed which can lead to choking. Swallowing the shards can also cause digestive problems later on in the day. Not exactly the present that you were hoping for this Christmas. It should also be noted that poultry/bird bones are hollow and splinter very easily so should never be given to a dog.

Decorations

Christmas decorations are great to look at. Unfortunately they look as good to dogs as they do to us – albeit in less colour! The problem is that dogs cannot differentiate between a bauble and a tennis ball, if it’s round and it rolls then it’s probably going to be chased.

Baubles aren’t really toxic to dogs, but unfortunately they are likely to shatter which means shards of plastic or glass can get stuck in paws or in digestive tracts.

Tinsel is another Christmas favourite, and again another concern for your four legged pal.  Whilst not very toxic, tinsel is long and slinky which means it is easy to chow down on. The main trouble with tinsel is that it can cause a blockage in the digestive tract. The worst case scenario would be if it started to work its way through the body whilst some of it is still in the stomach! This would be a real cause for concern and require an immediate trip to the vet.

Christmas Tree Chocolates

Chocolate tree decorations are fantastic for that Christmas day treat. Unfortunately chocolate is very poisonous to dogs. The trouble is that chocolate can fall off the tree without you noticing, which means it is fair game for any four-legged friends. Chocolate wrappers can also have a bad effect on a dog as it passes through their gut. We strongly suggest taking steps to try and make it as difficult for dogs to reach and eat these treats as possible.

Electrical Goods

Christmas presents normally go hand in hand with electrical goods.  Whilst the idea of watching TV probably doesn’t appeal to your canine friend, having something to chew on probably does. Electrical wires are a prime example, especially if they have not been moved well away from doggy accessible places. Your family pet is going to be in for a shock if they manage to chew all the way through the wire.

The same could be said for batteries which are probably going to be in abundance with all the new gadgets and gizmos that Santa brought the family this year. When pierced or ingested, the acid inside can cause severe chemical burns or heavy metal poisoning.

Holly, Mistletoe and Poinsettia

You know you’re in the festive season when you see Holly, Mistletoe and Poinsettia decorating peoples homes. Like most other things in your house, your dog probably looks at these plants and see’s a snack.

Many people think that Poinsettia is an extremely deadly plant for pets and children, though this is rarely the case. The plants brightly coloured leaves contain a sap which is highly irritating to skin, and will cause abdominal pain when ingested. Other symptoms include: excessive drooling, nausea, and vomiting. If your precious pooch decides to take a bite, it is likely to be too irritated by the plants sap to continue eating. However, you should still take care when displaying this plant if you have a dog in the house.

Holly and Mistletoe are generally more toxic than Poinsettia. Both are known to cause intestinal upset, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Mistletoe contains toxic substances that can do real damage when ingested in large quantities, these symptoms include: massive drop in blood pressure, breathing problems, seizures, and deadly in some very severe cases. We seriously suggest keeping these plants well away from anywhere that you family dog can reach them.

Whilst the above are some very important Christmas doggy dangers to look out for, by staying vigilant and keeping an eye on your pet, you can ensure that everyone in the family has a perfect Christmas this year.

Please note that DogFence does not accept any liability for the content of this page and is only intended as a guide. If you are worried about your pets health, or wish to know more about Christmas dangers to you pet, please contact your local veterinary practice.

christmas dog staring at a roast chicken

The Dog That Stole Christmas

Let us set the scene for you.

You’ve been slow roasting your Christmas turkey all through the night. The smell is truly heavenly wafting through the house like an angel sent to bless you and give you good fortune. You have basted this creation a thousand times to make sure that the taste is perfect for when all 20 of your family members come round today. You even cooked the pigs in blankets with the turkey so that they too would be a dinnertime delight.

Its finally time to take the turkey out of the oven. The smell warms you up like a Christmas fire and your mouth starts to salivate like the family dog sat next to you, longing for a taste of the wonder in front of him. ‘DING DONG’ goes the bell. The first of your family members has arrived and of course no one else in the house is going to answer the door. You put the Christmas lunch centrepiece on the worktop for what you imagine will only be twenty seconds, but it is more than enough time for a four legged thief to make its move.

CLANG

A sound from the kitchen? You rush to your turkey like a mother to a crying child and find your hopes and dreams for the perfect Christmas lunch dashed to the kitchen floor. The family dog had somehow managed to jump up on the side and steal the turkey for himself. He couldn’t help it, he wanted to savour the bird as much as you did! He looks up with a sense of guilt in his eyes as he tucks into the juiciest cut of the bird.

Tears welling up, you remember the advert that you saw online for a DogFence Indoor Boundary System. At the time it didn’t seem necessary. Your beloved pet had never needed to be kept away from anything in your house before, so why would you need one now?

Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Make sure your dog doesn’t steal Christmas this year.  Get in touch with us on 01628 476475 to find out how to keep your dog away from the Christmas dinner.